Motorhome  Tab 1 of 5 - (Press Enter to hear more about motorhomes) Pop-up Camper  Tab 2 of 5 - (Press Enter to hear more about Pop-up Campers) Fifth Wheel Trailer Tab 3 of 5 - (Press Enter to hear more about Fifth Wheel Trailers) Slide-on Camper  Tab 4 of 5 - (Press Enter to hear more about Slide-on Campers) Travel Trailer  Tab 5 of 5 - (Press Enter to hear more about Travel Trailers)

Class C motorhomes are the classic mid-sized motorized RV, typically with a sleeping area extending above the cab area. Premiums vary based on state of residence and the size, age and market value of the motorhome, plus frequency of use. An Idaho buyer looking at a supersized Class C motorhome[3] valued at $120,000 was quoted $3,097 a year; some owners report similar rates, but others are paying $800-$1,000 a year.

RV insurance covers many of the similar risks that auto insurance does, including collision, comprehensive and liability coverage. You can also get additional protection for your personal belongings on board, equipment and attached accessories such as awnings and satellite dishes. Depending on the insurance company you choose, your additional coverage options may include:

You can get various levels of liability coverage for your RV, although many states often require that you have a minimum amount of coverage. However, that might not be enough to completely cover your liability in case you injure someone. So you might want to get more coverage by adding additional liability coverage to your policy or getting an umbrella policy that will provide you with additional general liability coverage.

It’s important to note that every company considers credit very differently, and even among insurers this factor fluctuates by state. For example, NerdWallet’s 2019 car insurance rate analysis indicates that while State Farm charges higher rates for poor credit in many states, it doesn’t seem to do so in Maine. Similar variations are true for many other companies as well.
A common mistake that is made by RV owners is simply adding their recreational vehicle directly under their current auto policy instead of purchasing a specialty RV policy. Insuring your RV with an auto policy may leave you exposed to unpleasant surprises in the event that you need to file a claim. In most cases, a specialty RV policy costs less than an auto policy, even though it provides more comprehensive coverage. Give your RV the special protection it deserves, only available through a specialty RV carrier.
Some rental companies offer RV insurance as an additional purchase with your rental. You may also see this through P2P websites like ours, where the owner allows you to go on their insurance for a fee. This can be a convenient option, as the process of going through an RV rental insurance company can be tedious. However, make sure you check what the limits and deductibles are – you don’t want to get stuck in a situation where you’re underinsured or have to pay a $3,000 deductible!

On average, RV insurance for a motor home costs around $600 a year and insurance for a nonmotorized trailer costs around $300 a year. The specific cost of your RV insurance will depend on your RV. Insurance on a $10,000 nonmotorized trailer will cost significantly less than insurance for a $200,000 luxury RV, for instance. In general, though, expect your RV insurance to cost less than your car insurance.
While JD Power-recommended companies above aren’t among the cheapest of the insurance companies we’ve examined, they might suit your needs. It’s important to think beyond price to find a comfortable middle ground between claims satisfaction and affordability. Use The Zebra’s side-by-side insurance comparisons to avoid some of the legwork involved in insurance shopping.

We want to hear from you and encourage a lively discussion among our users. Please help us keep our site clean and safe by following our posting guidelines, and avoid disclosing personal or sensitive information such as bank account or phone numbers. Any comments posted under NerdWallet's official account are not reviewed or endorsed by representatives of financial institutions affiliated with the reviewed products, unless explicitly stated otherwise.
Advanced economies account for the bulk of global insurance. With premium income of $1.62 trillion, Europe was the most important region in 2010, followed by North America $1.409 trillion and Asia $1.161 trillion. Europe has however seen a decline in premium income during the year in contrast to the growth seen in North America and Asia. The top four countries generated more than a half of premiums. The United States and Japan alone accounted for 40% of world insurance, much higher than their 7% share of the global population. Emerging economies accounted for over 85% of the world's population but only around 15% of premiums. Their markets are however growing at a quicker pace.[44] The country expected to have the biggest impact on the insurance share distribution across the world is China. According to Sam Radwan of ENHANCE International LLC, low premium penetration (insurance premium as a % of GDP), an ageing population and the largest car market in terms of new sales, premium growth has averaged 15–20% in the past five years, and China is expected to be the largest insurance market in the next decade or two.[45]

Products underwritten by Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company and Affiliated Companies. Not all Nationwide affiliated companies are mutual companies, and not all Nationwide members are insured by a mutual company. Subject to underwriting guidelines, review and approval. Products and discounts not available to all persons in all states. Nationwide Investment Services Corporation, member FINRA. Home Office: One Nationwide Plaza, Columbus, OH. Nationwide, the Nationwide N and Eagle and other marks displayed on this page are service marks of Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company, unless otherwise disclosed. ©2019. Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company.
If your family enjoys the great outdoors, we’ll bet favorite activities include recreational vehicles. Maybe you spend summers waterskiing at the lake. You may enjoy exploring the backcountry on ATVs or snowmobiles. Or you might consider an RV the perfect way to travel — experiencing new places but still getting to spend every night in your own bed.

If you live in your RV full-time for more than six months of the year, Allstate will not be able to insure your RV. Because of that, Allstate is a more suitable provider for people who only use their RVs occasionally: Its policies include basic coverage, sound system coverage, personal belongings coverage, medical payment, roadside assistance, and rental reimbursement.
On the other hand, states where most of the drivers are properly insured and reside in rural areas saw some of the lowest car insurance rates. Maine climbed to the top of the heap this year with an average annual premium of $845, which is 42 percent below the national average. Wisconsin moved into the second place and Idaho stays in third place for the second year in a row. Iowa and Virginia filled out the top five.
My National General policy is up for renewal so I have shopped around. Tried FMCA (Progressive) and AARP(Hartford) and they couldn't compete. I have total replacement coverage with National General and the other companies would not provide that. I also have my car on the same policy and although Hartford were close Progressive was almost double. I have had Hartford previously and they did pay up quickly when I had a claim so I would like to use them again, but only if they can offer a competitive policy.
The above is meant as general information and as general policy descriptions to help you understand the different types of coverages. These descriptions do not refer to any specific contract of insurance and they do not modify any definitions, exclusions or any other provision expressly stated in any contracts of insurance. We encourage you to speak to your insurance representative and to read your policy contract to fully understand your coverages.
×