A common mistake that is made by RV owners is simply adding their recreational vehicle directly under their current auto policy instead of purchasing a specialty RV policy. Insuring your RV with an auto policy may leave you exposed to unpleasant surprises in the event that you need to file a claim. In most cases, a specialty RV policy costs less than an auto policy, even though it provides more comprehensive coverage. Give your RV the special protection it deserves, only available through a specialty RV carrier.
National Insurance offers coverage that includes total loss replacement, and purchase price guarantee that allows you to more easily replace your vehicle if it is destroyed in a crash. They also offer a diminishing deductible, which is reduced by 25 percent each year that you’re claims-free. The coverage includes your personal effects that are worth under $1,000, but you can purchase special coverages for items that are worth over $1,000 each in $1,000 increments. They also offer emergency vehicle vacation expenses in case your trip is disrupted.
If you attempt to insure your RV along with your car, odds are you'll only get coverage for physical damage, without any of the comprehensive features necessary to an RV that serves as a primary residence. Ideally, RVs that are primary residences should have policies that combine the features of both home and auto insurance, even if the RV is stationary.

Many institutional insurance purchasers buy insurance through an insurance broker. While on the surface it appears the broker represents the buyer (not the insurance company), and typically counsels the buyer on appropriate coverage and policy limitations, in the vast majority of cases a broker's compensation comes in the form of a commission as a percentage of the insurance premium, creating a conflict of interest in that the broker's financial interest is tilted towards encouraging an insured to purchase more insurance than might be necessary at a higher price. A broker generally holds contracts with many insurers, thereby allowing the broker to "shop" the market for the best rates and coverage possible.
By law, any type of registered vehicle must be insured. Motorhomes, like cars, are required to at least have liability insurance. Travel trailers and other towable RVs, on the other hand, cannot be driven and therefore aren’t required to have insurance. Keep in mind that towable RVs, although not vehicles, are still susceptible to theft, damage from natural disasters, vandalism, and collision, so it is highly recommended for them to still have coverage.
Smaller non-motorized RVs might need only standard auto insurance. In general a truck camper (a separate unit that slides into the bed of a pickup truck) costs less to insure than large trailers, because the pickup is usually already insured and the camper unit is considered cargo that can be covered with a relatively inexpensive rider to the auto insurance. Popup tent trailers are also relatively inexpensive to add to an existing auto insurance policy, and any theft of personal items when camping may be covered under homeowner's insurance.
If the open road is calling you and a recreational vehicle, or RV, is the way you want to go, it may be smart to hitch on some RV insurance. While some owners opt to cover their RV with an endorsement on their auto insurance policy, insurance companies including Progressive, Nationwide, Geico and GMAC offer specialized RV insurance that resembles a combination of car insurance, home or renters insurance, and travel insurance rolled into one policy.

All of Progressive’s RV insurance policies come with standard coverage: comprehensive, collision, liability, uninsured/underinsured motorist, and medical payments. Consumers seeking extra coverage will see that Progressive provides a number of options at no additional cost, including pet injury, Mexico physical damage, and trailer coverage for motorhomes.
The amount of insurance your RV requires will mainly depend on the type of motorhome or towable you own, how often you use it, and whether you plan to reside in it for six or more months out of the year. There are two types of recreational vehicles, the towable trailer and the motorhome, which falls into three categories: Class A, B or C motorhomes. Class A motorhomes are the largest and tend to be the most expensive. They often include luxury features, customized amenities, and permanent attachments that may require additional protection. Class B vehicles are the smallest type of RV, also known as “camper vans,” and are generally much cheaper to insure than larger motorhomes. Class C vehicles are a hybrid of Class A and B.
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While you might want to finish shopping for car insurance as quickly as possible, it’s important to do your due diligence and find the right company. At the end of the day, car insurance is designed to protect and benefit you. If you were to be injured or have your car totaled in an accident, your insurer’s customer service and claims satisfaction would be vital.
USAA Insurance Agency means USAA Insurance Agency, Inc., or USAA of Texas Insurance Agency. CA Lic. #0D78305, TX Lic. #7096. 9800 Fredericksburg Road, San Antonio, TX 78288. The agency represents third-party insurers that are not affiliated with USAA and provides services to you on their behalf. Third party products are not underwritten by USAA or its affiliates. The agency receives a commission on the sale or renewal of third-party insurance products and may receive other performance-based compensation from them. Product availability may vary in some locations.

Insurance company claims departments employ a large number of claims adjusters supported by a staff of records management and data entry clerks. Incoming claims are classified based on severity and are assigned to adjusters whose settlement authority varies with their knowledge and experience. The adjuster undertakes an investigation of each claim, usually in close cooperation with the insured, determines if coverage is available under the terms of the insurance contract, and if so, the reasonable monetary value of the claim, and authorizes payment.
Getting an insurance quote on RVInsurance.com is a fast and uncomplicated process. Users only need to input their zip code to start so that the company can verify if they are in one of the 48 continental states where it can provide them with quotes. Then, it’s a matter of providing some personal and vehicle information, choosing from any available discounts, and getting a final rate.
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