Motorhomes, RVs and campervans all have their own engines and do not need to be towed, while caravans and non-motorised horse floats do not have engines and must be towed like trailers. Some insurers cover both types of mobile homes with the same policies, while others have different policies for each. It is important to be aware of this before looking for insurance.
In July 2007, The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) released a report presenting the results of a study concerning credit-based insurance scores in automobile insurance. The study found that these scores are effective predictors of risk. It also showed that African-Americans and Hispanics are substantially overrepresented in the lowest credit scores, and substantially underrepresented in the highest, while Caucasians and Asians are more evenly spread across the scores. The credit scores were also found to predict risk within each of the ethnic groups, leading the FTC to conclude that the scoring models are not solely proxies for redlining. The FTC indicated little data was available to evaluate benefit of insurance scores to consumers.[58] The report was disputed by representatives of the Consumer Federation of America, the National Fair Housing Alliance, the National Consumer Law Center, and the Center for Economic Justice, for relying on data provided by the insurance industry.[59]
Insurance terms, definitions and explanations are intended for informational purposes only and do not in any way replace or modify the definitions and information contained in individual insurance contracts, policies or declaration pages, which are controlling. Such terms and availability may vary by state and exclusions may apply. Discounts may not be applied to all policy coverages.
For this review, we focused on national providers and left out any companies that only insure RVs locally. Odds are, national insurers are able to provide coverage no matter where you are in the U.S., and they are more likely to have the financial strength to support you. If you’re trusting a provider to come through when you’re most in need, it’s reassuring to have a company with years of experience and a history of financial success at your back.
A common mistake that is made by RV owners is simply adding their recreational vehicle directly under their current auto policy instead of purchasing a specialty RV policy. Insuring your RV with an auto policy may leave you exposed to unpleasant surprises in the event that you need to file a claim. In most cases, a specialty RV policy costs less than an auto policy, even though it provides more comprehensive coverage. Give your RV the special protection it deserves, only available through a specialty RV carrier.

Bus-home conversions are a rapidly-growing trend that several RV insurance companies are adapting into their policies. The type of bus, however, is a prominent deciding factor in coverage, since bus axles differ from traditional RVs and aren’t built to carry a certain amount of weight. Many RV insurance companies avoid school bus-converted homes, as they have a higher risk of rollover accidents. Also, your bus-converted home must be registered as a recreational vehicle for personal use to be eligible for RV-insurance. Depending on the state where you register your vehicle, it may require your bus to comply with several requirements and meet certain standards before registration. It’s important that you check with your local department of motor vehicles beforehand.
An entity seeking to transfer risk (an individual, corporation, or association of any type, etc.) becomes the 'insured' party once risk is assumed by an 'insurer', the insuring party, by means of a contract, called an insurance policy. Generally, an insurance contract includes, at a minimum, the following elements: identification of participating parties (the insurer, the insured, the beneficiaries), the premium, the period of coverage, the particular loss event covered, the amount of coverage (i.e., the amount to be paid to the insured or beneficiary in the event of a loss), and exclusions (events not covered). An insured is thus said to be "indemnified" against the loss covered in the policy.
Global insurance premiums grew by 2.7% in inflation-adjusted terms in 2010 to $4.3 trillion, climbing above pre-crisis levels. The return to growth and record premiums generated during the year followed two years of decline in real terms. Life insurance premiums increased by 3.2% in 2010 and non-life premiums by 2.1%. While industrialised countries saw an increase in premiums of around 1.4%, insurance markets in emerging economies saw rapid expansion with 11% growth in premium income. The global insurance industry was sufficiently capitalised to withstand the financial crisis of 2008 and 2009 and most insurance companies restored their capital to pre-crisis levels by the end of 2010. With the continuation of the gradual recovery of the global economy, it is likely the insurance industry will continue to see growth in premium income both in industrialised countries and emerging markets in 2011.
Defense Base Act (DBA) insurance provides coverage for civilian workers hired by the government to perform contracts outside the United States and Canada. DBA is required for all U.S. citizens, U.S. residents, U.S. Green Card holders, and all employees or subcontractors hired on overseas government contracts. Depending on the country, foreign nationals must also be covered under DBA. This coverage typically includes expenses related to medical treatment and loss of wages, as well as disability and death benefits.
When judging coverage and benefits, we singled out RV insurance carriers that offered extensive and flexible coverage options. To be considered for our list, companies had to provide all the traditional insurance protection, as well as a healthy amount of RV-specific options. Most RV insurers offer liability, personal injury protection (PIP), collision, underinsured or uninsured motorist, and comprehensive coverage. Other types, such as full-timer and Mexico coverage, vary in availability from company to company.
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