Loan-Free RV means you own the camper outright without any financing. RV insurance is only optional when your RV has no loan on it and is towable only. Insurance is not optional for motorhomes unless you live in a state that doesn’t require RV insurance. If you're driving your RV on the road, you'll be required to carry the same state-mandated liability insurance you'd need to carry on a regular automobile. These requirements vary by state, but almost every state requires some type of liability coverage for damage you might cause to other vehicles.
National General’s list of discounts is varied enough to provide every type of customer with a chance to lower their premiums and/or deductibles, but Baby Boomers are particularly well positioned to capitalize on them. For example, the company allows customers to bundle RV and auto policies under its One Convenient Policy program. National General also offers homeowners discounts that are easy for them to qualify for, as Boomers are more affluent than other generations on average and thus more likely to own a house and additional vehicles.
The point of owning an RV is to have the ability to travel from state to state in comfort, which means you'll need comprehensive and collision insurance as well as bodily injury, property damage liability coverage and uninsured motorist coverage that applies wherever you travel. Standard RV coverage isn’t much different from regular auto insurance, but the risks involved are potentially much higher since RVs cost more to fix and replace and the number of people traveling in the RV is likely to be higher than in a car.
According to Greg Gerber, “Most car insurance firms don’t have a clue of what can go wrong with an RV and don’t provide the coverage to get it fixed adequately,” which is why he advises consumers to get a separate policy for their RVs instead of bundling, to “avoid the hassle that can come if the RV itself is broken and they’re trying to get their car insurance company to fix it.” 

Companies also needed to offer full-timer coverage for those who live year-round in their RV; full replacement coverage in the event the RV is totaled or stolen; personal belonging coverage for the property inside the RV, including electronics, appliances, and jewelry; vacation liability coverage for injuries that occur at the vacation site where the RV is parked; and permanently attached items coverage for items like satellite dishes, wheelchair lifts, or retractable canopies. Finally, companies also were required to cover most, if not all types of recreational vehicles.
×