Owning an RV can be a lot of fun and provide a novel way to travel across the country, but it also requires a large investment and should be treated as such. In addition to budgeting for maintenance and financing costs, when planning for a new set of house-toting wheels, it’s important to know whether or not RV insurance will be required for your recreational vehicle.

Upon termination of a given policy, the amount of premium collected minus the amount paid out in claims is the insurer's underwriting profit on that policy. Underwriting performance is measured by something called the "combined ratio", which is the ratio of expenses/losses to premiums.[25] A combined ratio of less than 100% indicates an underwriting profit, while anything over 100 indicates an underwriting loss. A company with a combined ratio over 100% may nevertheless remain profitable due to investment earnings.
In the European Union, the Third Non-Life Directive and the Third Life Directive, both passed in 1992 and effective 1994, created a single insurance market in Europe and allowed insurance companies to offer insurance anywhere in the EU (subject to permission from authority in the head office) and allowed insurance consumers to purchase insurance from any insurer in the EU.[48] As far as insurance in the United Kingdom, the Financial Services Authority took over insurance regulation from the General Insurance Standards Council in 2005;[49] laws passed include the Insurance Companies Act 1973 and another in 1982,[50] and reforms to warranty and other aspects under discussion as of 2012.[51]
The company offers RV insurance discounts and savings, for example for taking an accident prevention course, having anti-theft devices, putting your RV in winter storage, certain types of RVs, having more than one vehicle under the insurance, and choosing a higher deductible. How much you will pay will depend on your personal situation, the type of policy you choose, your driving record, how much you intend to use your RV, among other factors.
When storing an RV, check if the existing insurance policy has limits on coverage while in storage. The coverage may need to be expanded; many storage facilities sell additional insurance coverage. If renting an RV, find out whether it's covered on existing auto insurance or, if not, buy additional insurance from the rental company for about $15-$75 a day.
That’s because an RV is not just a vehicle – it’s often equal parts vehicle and home. For that reason, you might need insurance that includes coverage offered on homeowners insurance policies. You may need a policy that can cover emergency expenses like a hotel stay if your RV is totaled or being repaired. Given the fact that you are also traveling with your RV, you might need special coverage that allows you to travel across the country or in Mexico or Canada.
Certain insurance products and practices have been described as rent-seeking by critics.[citation needed] That is, some insurance products or practices are useful primarily because of legal benefits, such as reducing taxes, as opposed to providing protection against risks of adverse events. Under United States tax law, for example, most owners of variable annuities and variable life insurance can invest their premium payments in the stock market and defer or eliminate paying any taxes on their investments until withdrawals are made. Sometimes this tax deferral is the only reason people use these products.[citation needed] Another example is the legal infrastructure which allows life insurance to be held in an irrevocable trust which is used to pay an estate tax while the proceeds themselves are immune from the estate tax.
This summer, thousands of Americans will take to the road in their motorhomes. RV travel is becoming one of the most popular ways to vacation since it’s affordable, convenient, and fun. Gone are the days of having to buy an RV and maintain it just to take an occasional vacation; now, RV rental services make it easy for anyone on any budget to go RVing. But while the process of renting an RV is simple, there’s one aspect of it that’s a bit more of a conundrum: RV rental insurance. We’ve put together this guide for those of you who are wondering how to get RV rental insurance.
According to Greg Gerber, “Most car insurance firms don’t have a clue of what can go wrong with an RV and don’t provide the coverage to get it fixed adequately,” which is why he advises consumers to get a separate policy for their RVs instead of bundling, to “avoid the hassle that can come if the RV itself is broken and they’re trying to get their car insurance company to fix it.” 
When insured parties experience a loss for a specified peril, the coverage entitles the policyholder to make a claim against the insurer for the covered amount of loss as specified by the policy. The fee paid by the insured to the insurer for assuming the risk is called the premium. Insurance premiums from many insureds are used to fund accounts reserved for later payment of claims – in theory for a relatively few claimants – and for overhead costs. So long as an insurer maintains adequate funds set aside for anticipated losses (called reserves), the remaining margin is an insurer's profit.
Class C motorhomes are the classic mid-sized motorized RV, typically with a sleeping area extending above the cab area. Premiums vary based on state of residence and the size, age and market value of the motorhome, plus frequency of use. An Idaho buyer looking at a supersized Class C motorhome[3] valued at $120,000 was quoted $3,097 a year; some owners report similar rates, but others are paying $800-$1,000 a year.
Good customer service is especially essential when you’re in a crisis after an accident or theft. Excellent insurance providers make it easy for you to file a claim online or over the phone. They also offer accessible service 24/7 through a customer helpline or roadside assistance. If a company’s a hassle to deal with when you truly need help, it may make an already difficult situation even more trying.
Earthquake insurance is a form of property insurance that pays the policyholder in the event of an earthquake that causes damage to the property. Most ordinary home insurance policies do not cover earthquake damage. Earthquake insurance policies generally feature a high deductible. Rates depend on location and hence the likelihood of an earthquake, as well as the construction of the home.
Do you live in your RV full-time, or does it sit in storage for most of the year? Do you have any permanent attachments like a satellite dish? Every company offers basic RV coverage, but the right provider for you also offers the set of add-ons that speaks to your main concerns, whether it’s full-time residency insurance or roadside assistance. Our top picks all have plenty of add-ons in addition to basic coverage.

Both part-timers and full-timers can find coverage geared towards their type of RVing. Part-timers can opt for Progressive’s vacation liability coverage, which offers up to $10,000, with an upgrade of up to $500,000 if someone is hurt in or around their RV while they are on vacation, and emergency expense coverage, which provides $750 for transportation and hotel costs plus meals, again, if they are on vacation. Full-timers can enhance their coverage with Progressive’s full timer’s personal liability, replacement cost of personal effects, and total loss coverages.

How much insurance you need, depends on what your priorities are. Obviously, if you took out a loan to purchase your RV, you want to make sure you are covered at full replacement or purchase value so that you can pay off your loan. You’ll also want to get uninsured and underinsured motorists protection in case someone hits you, and they can’t fully pay for your RV’s repair.
Upon termination of a given policy, the amount of premium collected minus the amount paid out in claims is the insurer's underwriting profit on that policy. Underwriting performance is measured by something called the "combined ratio", which is the ratio of expenses/losses to premiums.[25] A combined ratio of less than 100% indicates an underwriting profit, while anything over 100 indicates an underwriting loss. A company with a combined ratio over 100% may nevertheless remain profitable due to investment earnings.
An insurance provider and you might not consider your RV to be worth the same. By settling on an agreed value with your potential RV insurance provider, you are ensuring that both you and your insurance company have the same value of your RV in mind if you face a worst-case scenario—the total loss of your RV. It’s also important to ask about the next lower threshold for an agreed value premium. By agreeing to a slightly lower level of coverage, you might be able to save plenty on your premiums.
You’ll notice that none of that liability coverage pays for your car or injuries, nor for any injuries your passengers sustain if you cause a wreck. This is why many people — particularly those whose car isn’t yet paid off — want “full coverage” car insurance. This isn’t actually a type of coverage, but instead typically refers to policies that include liability coverage, plus comprehensive and collision coverages.

Further examples are the company’s storage option and low mileage discount—both great solutions for part-time RVers. Baby Boomers are more likely to own a home and those that were born between 1946 and 1964 are now heading into retirement. This makes them more prone to RV part-time rather than full-time when compared to Millennials, for example. Some Baby Boomers end up making their RVs a home-on-wheels, but many are also likely to take their RV out for vacation with their families, or to explore the great outdoors for certain seasons or periods of time.
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