Nationwide’s coverage options make it easy for part-time RV users with accessorized RVs to get the support they need. Besides basic coverage, Nationwide also insures personal belongings and sound systems. If you’ve tricked out your RV especially for vacation, Nationwide has you covered there, too: It provides roadside assistance, rental reimbursement, emergency expenses, and vacation liability for personal injuries.
Roadside assistance is quite comprehensive in Progressive RV insurance as it includes all lodging expenses generally at a limit of two thousand dollars. This coverage kicks in the moment you are a specified distance away from home. It is likely you will require more coverage for this than normal as towing an RV costs more than what it does to tow other vehicles.
Good customer service is especially essential when you’re in a crisis after an accident or theft. Excellent insurance providers make it easy for you to file a claim online or over the phone. They also offer accessible service 24/7 through a customer helpline or roadside assistance. If a company’s a hassle to deal with when you truly need help, it may make an already difficult situation even more trying.
Foremost Insurance Group provides comprehensive coverage against loss, collision, fire, smoke, floods, landslides, hail, animals, vandalism, low branches, theft, and other accidents. They also cover items like awnings, satellite dishes, TV antennas, and more. The company’s loss replacement coverage allows you to get a new trailer if your model is less than five years old and you’re the original owner, and then you received what you paid for your RV in years six through 10.
Although most auto insurance policies offer this one, towing or providing fuel for an RV is much more expensive than towing or filling up a car or an SUV. Having the right roadside assistance coverage is extremely important, especially if you’re far from home. Roadside assistance can help you cover the costs of mechanical or electrical breakdowns, battery failure, flat tires, or lock-outs, among many other things.

While not all large insurance companies are the same, some of them might be selling insurance policies for vehicles that they do not have much experience covering. RV insurance in particular is offered by many auto insurance companies who may not be well prepared for handling the intricacies of an RV insurance claim. When choosing who is going to insure your vehicle, make sure it is a provider who specializes in RV insurance—regardless of its size—or that at least has a good track record of dealing with RV insurance policies and claims.
Class C motorhomes are the classic mid-sized motorized RV, typically with a sleeping area extending above the cab area. Premiums vary based on state of residence and the size, age and market value of the motorhome, plus frequency of use. An Idaho buyer looking at a supersized Class C motorhome[3] valued at $120,000 was quoted $3,097 a year; some owners report similar rates, but others are paying $800-$1,000 a year.
Most of our top picks offer a slew of discounts, so be sure to check out each company’s available options. Typically, you’ll save money if you’re able to bundle your auto and RV insurance together. Some providers also offer discounts for having a membership to an RV club or completing RV training/safety courses. Additionally, many insurers consider you less of a risk if your RV is equipped with updated safety features like air bags, anti-lock brakes, and anti-theft devices. And remember: The fewer traffic violations you have, the lower your premium will be.

Class A motorhomes are the largest and most expensive category of motorized RV. Premium costs depend on the motorhome's age, size and value, and frequency of use. RVersOnline.org[1] estimates average insurance costs of $1,000-$1,300 a year for a gas-powered Class A motorhome used 140 days each year. And a Mississippi resident[2] pays $1,200-$1,400 a year to insure a 1994 motorhome used 30-150 days each year, while the owner of a 2000 Itasca Suncruiser pays $500 a year with a $500 deductible.


The above is meant as general information and as general policy descriptions to help you understand the different types of coverages. These descriptions do not refer to any specific contract of insurance and they do not modify any definitions, exclusions or any other provision expressly stated in any contracts of insurance. We encourage you to speak to your insurance representative and to read your policy contract to fully understand your coverages.
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