Full-time RVers can enjoy coverage similar to that of homeowners insurance through the Good Sam Insurance Agency’s specialized protection plan for full timers or first-time weekend RVers. Full-Time Insurance goes above and beyond what traditional Auto Insurance policies can protect because it covers a number of other incidents and situations that regular RV insurance does not.

Financed RVs are generally required by the financial lien-holder to carry full coverage because lenders want reimbursement on their loan in case of a loss. If you do not purchase full coverage, your lender could take out an insurance policy on the vehicle and send you the bill. Lender-purchased insurance typically comes with much higher premiums and no liability, so taking responsibility for your own insurance is a smart financial decision.
When insured parties experience a loss for a specified peril, the coverage entitles the policyholder to make a claim against the insurer for the covered amount of loss as specified by the policy. The fee paid by the insured to the insurer for assuming the risk is called the premium. Insurance premiums from many insureds are used to fund accounts reserved for later payment of claims – in theory for a relatively few claimants – and for overhead costs. So long as an insurer maintains adequate funds set aside for anticipated losses (called reserves), the remaining margin is an insurer's profit.

Adjusting liability insurance claims is particularly difficult because there is a third party involved, the plaintiff, who is under no contractual obligation to cooperate with the insurer and may in fact regard the insurer as a deep pocket. The adjuster must obtain legal counsel for the insured (either inside "house" counsel or outside "panel" counsel), monitor litigation that may take years to complete, and appear in person or over the telephone with settlement authority at a mandatory settlement conference when requested by the judge.


Do you live in your RV full-time, or does it sit in storage for most of the year? Do you have any permanent attachments like a satellite dish? Every company offers basic RV coverage, but the right provider for you also offers the set of add-ons that speaks to your main concerns, whether it’s full-time residency insurance or roadside assistance. Our top picks all have plenty of add-ons in addition to basic coverage.
DISCLAIMER: RV Favorites strives to keep its information accurate and up to date. This information, however, may be different than what you see or retrieve when you visit a dealership, a private RV seller, an RV manufacturer, a financial institution, service provider, RVIA agent, RV campsite, or specific product’s site. All financial products, RV specifications, shopping products and services are presented without warranty. When evaluating offers, please review the RV manufacturers, service provider, RV camp, dealership´s, and financial institution’s Terms and Conditions.
Home insurance, also commonly called hazard insurance or homeowners insurance (often abbreviated in the real estate industry as HOI), provides coverage for damage or destruction of the policyholder's home. In some geographical areas, the policy may exclude certain types of risks, such as flood or earthquake, that require additional coverage. Maintenance-related issues are typically the homeowner's responsibility. The policy may include inventory, or this can be bought as a separate policy, especially for people who rent housing. In some countries, insurers offer a package which may include liability and legal responsibility for injuries and property damage caused by members of the household, including pets.[35]

This is included with our motorhome insurance policies and is not usually included in your typical auto policy. This provides protection from just about any direct, sudden, and accidental loss, including; collision, fire, smoke, floods, landslides, hail, windstorms, animals, vandalism, low branches or overhangs, theft and lightning. We also include Coverage for Attached Accessories, including awnings, satellite dishes, TV antennas and more.


The best RV insurance is affordable, comprehensive, and flexible according to your needs. Because your RV functions as both a home and a car, insurance policies resemble a combination of home and auto insurance — and consequently, they tend to be somewhat more complex and expensive. Policy price will vary depending on your location, class of RV, age and condition of the vehicle, frequency of use, and more. We dig into the pros and cons of several stellar providers below, although RV insurance prices vary based on specific location and situations. We recommend getting quotes from multiple companies to see which offers you the best quote.
Most of our top picks offer a slew of discounts, so be sure to check out each company’s available options. Typically, you’ll save money if you’re able to bundle your auto and RV insurance together. Some providers also offer discounts for having a membership to an RV club or completing RV training/safety courses. Additionally, many insurers consider you less of a risk if your RV is equipped with updated safety features like air bags, anti-lock brakes, and anti-theft devices. And remember: The fewer traffic violations you have, the lower your premium will be.
As with our other large insurance providers, Nationwide has a mobile app that allows you to file a claim, pay your bill, and view your insurance card. However, while it currently has a 4.2-star rating on the Apple App Store, its Google Play rating sits at a mediocre 3.5. Many users complain that several of the app’s features malfunction and need attention from developers. If you’re trying to file a claim after an accident, you don’t need the additional stress of a poorly functioning app, even if it’s free. While the app’s capabilities may improve over time, it’s best to stick with providers like Allstate if mobile app functionality is important to you.
When you rent an RV, the company will almost always provide some type of liability coverage. This protects you against third party claims. You’ll also get roadside assistance in case you break down while you’re on the road. However, you still need to have RV rental insurance coverage, which covers other situations that don’t fall under liability coverage. You have a few options to get RV rental insurance:
When it comes to personal property coverage, you might want to get cash value coverage on your valuables. Or maybe full replacement value coverage is best for you. The best way to know if you have enough coverage is to imagine the worst-case scenarios and think about what you would do if they happened. Extra insurance can protect you if you don’t have significant personal savings.
But liability coverage levels come in threes — you’ll probably see something like 50/100/50 up to 250/500/250 in typical policies. You can think of these limits like: individual injuries / total injuries / property damage. Insurers are a little more technical, calling them bodily injury liability, total bodily injury liability and physical damage liability.
Most of our top picks offer a slew of discounts, so be sure to check out each company’s available options. Typically, you’ll save money if you’re able to bundle your auto and RV insurance together. Some providers also offer discounts for having a membership to an RV club or completing RV training/safety courses. Additionally, many insurers consider you less of a risk if your RV is equipped with updated safety features like air bags, anti-lock brakes, and anti-theft devices. And remember: The fewer traffic violations you have, the lower your premium will be.
Experienced Drivers Save On Rates: Driving an RV isn’t the same as driving a car or truck. Motorhome drivers need time to adjust to abnormal driving conditions usually not experience by cars and trucks. For example: RV Drivers need to worry about height restrictions, big blind spots and leaving extra room for back swing when turning just to name a few. You are less risky to the insurance company if you have experience driving an RV already.

If you purchase a new travel trailer for $10,000 cash, insurance is optional because there's no finance company involved; however, you would probably still want to carry full coverage on it. A total loss, such as fire or theft, would be devastating to most people without insurance to cover the investment-loss costs of your RV. Determine the value of your RV versus the likelihood of a loss to before you decide to self-insure your travel trailer’s physical damage risk and see if it’s really worth it.
In the United States, insurance is regulated by the states under the McCarran-Ferguson Act, with "periodic proposals for federal intervention", and a nonprofit coalition of state insurance agencies called the National Association of Insurance Commissioners works to harmonize the country's different laws and regulations.[46] The National Conference of Insurance Legislators (NCOIL) also works to harmonize the different state laws.[47]
Bus-home conversions are a rapidly-growing trend that several RV insurance companies are adapting into their policies. The type of bus, however, is a prominent deciding factor in coverage, since bus axles differ from traditional RVs and aren’t built to carry a certain amount of weight. Many RV insurance companies avoid school bus-converted homes, as they have a higher risk of rollover accidents. Also, your bus-converted home must be registered as a recreational vehicle for personal use to be eligible for RV-insurance. Depending on the state where you register your vehicle, it may require your bus to comply with several requirements and meet certain standards before registration. It’s important that you check with your local department of motor vehicles beforehand.
The best RV insurance is affordable, comprehensive, and flexible according to your needs. Because your RV functions as both a home and a car, insurance policies resemble a combination of home and auto insurance — and consequently, they tend to be somewhat more complex and expensive. Policy price will vary depending on your location, class of RV, age and condition of the vehicle, frequency of use, and more. We dig into the pros and cons of several stellar providers below, although RV insurance prices vary based on specific location and situations. We recommend getting quotes from multiple companies to see which offers you the best quote.

Get a free RV Insurance quote from the trusted agents at Overland Insurance! Your agent will be able to compare rates & insurance costs from different companies and personalize your RV insurance quote to get you the best possible rate for your Fifth Wheel, Travel Trailer, Class A, Class B or Class C Motorhome or RV. We also provide free full-timer RV Insurance quotes.
Nationwide’s coverage options make it easy for part-time RV users with accessorized RVs to get the support they need. Besides basic coverage, Nationwide also insures personal belongings and sound systems. If you’ve tricked out your RV especially for vacation, Nationwide has you covered there, too: It provides roadside assistance, rental reimbursement, emergency expenses, and vacation liability for personal injuries.
If an RV trailer is hooked up to an insured tow vehicle, it's should be covered for liability (damages to others) under the tow vehicle's insurance. Any personal items stolen from an RV trailer while camping may be covered under homeowner's insurance. However, this coverage is often limited, either by dollar amount or the specific circumstances covered. For damages to a trailer caused by an event other than a collision or overturn (like theft, fire, vandalism or falling objects) a policy with comprehensive coverage is needed.
An insurance policy specifically for RVs is normally a combination of homeowners insurance and auto insurance. This means that it will cover your home belongings, as well as the RV’s wheels, engine, and other automotive parts. This requires a special treatment and first tier companies such as Geico, Progressive RV insurance and Nationwide have specific products to cover these needs.
Each insurance company evaluates personal factors in its own way, and they keep their methods as hidden as possible. So we can’t tell you which company puts high value in your occupation or emphasizes a clean driving history more than others. But to help you get going, we can show you a car insurance rate comparison for the same hypothetical driver and car, using average rates from across the country.
Basic coverage — which is required by law — offers you protection for personal injuries and damages to the vehicle, but it won’t cover extras like your belongings inside. If you live in your RV full-time, it might also be a good idea to invest in additional protection that covers your housing expenses or RV replacement costs. Before shopping around, draw up a list of necessary coverage options and make sure they’re offered by your prospective provider.
While competition certainly helps keep premiums in check, it’s not the only factor. “In addition, under Virginia’s laws for seeking recovery, the person at fault for causing a car accident is held responsible for any resulting harm,” says Schrad. “Virginia also requires uninsured motorist coverage as part of a driver’s own auto insurance plan in case they are involved in an accident with an uninsured driver,” he continues. Not all states require drivers to carry uninsured motorist coverage.
One of Progressive’s add-on coverages includes a “disappearing deductible” option. This means that each year you don’t file a claim, Progressive will drop your rate by 25%. With this method, the company boasts that you could eventually have a $0 deductible. But it only stays this way as long as you haven’t filed a claim — if you do, your deductible will go right back up. Safeco also incentivizes safe driving with low deductibles. Safeco will reduce your collision deductible by $100 each year you don’t have a claim, but this incentive caps at $500.
eliminates the hassle of buying a separate towing plan. Towing, jump starts, roadside service, flat tire charges, fuel delivery, and locksmith service are just a toll-free phone call away. There are no out-of-pocket payments required, either. Just sign and drive. What's more, your motor home and your tow vehicle are covered, regardless of who is driving or where you are in US or Canada.
If you live in your RV full-time for more than six months of the year, Allstate will not be able to insure your RV. Because of that, Allstate is a more suitable provider for people who only use their RVs occasionally: Its policies include basic coverage, sound system coverage, personal belongings coverage, medical payment, roadside assistance, and rental reimbursement.
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If your family enjoys the great outdoors, we’ll bet favorite activities include recreational vehicles. Maybe you spend summers waterskiing at the lake. You may enjoy exploring the backcountry on ATVs or snowmobiles. Or you might consider an RV the perfect way to travel — experiencing new places but still getting to spend every night in your own bed.
Insuring travel trailers or fifth-wheel trailers (with a special hitch that's installed in the bed of a pickup truck) is generally less expensive than insuring a motorized RV, but premium charges still vary significantly based on state of residence and the size, age and market value of the trailer, plus frequency of use. The owner of a small, older fifth-wheel RV[4] valued at $8,000 reports paying about $170 a year for collision and comprehensive coverage; RV-Dreams.com reports that full-timer coverage[5] on a Keystone Cambridge fifth-wheel cost $896-$924 a year between 2005 and 2009; and RVersOnline.org estimates annual insurance costs of $1,300 a year for a luxury fifth wheel with a medium-duty truck, used 140 days a year.
Good Sam shows an outstanding number of positive reviews on Birdeye, a platform which the company uses in order to get first-hand customer feedback that is both relevant and reliable. On the platform, customer satisfaction relating to its products and services hovers at around 96%. The company is also accredited with the Better Business Bureau, where it currently holds an excellent A+ rating.
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