Pollution insurance usually takes the form of first-party coverage for contamination of insured property either by external or on-site sources. Coverage is also afforded for liability to third parties arising from contamination of air, water, or land due to the sudden and accidental release of hazardous materials from the insured site. The policy usually covers the costs of cleanup and may include coverage for releases from underground storage tanks. Intentional acts are specifically excluded.


Calculable loss: There are two elements that must be at least estimable, if not formally calculable: the probability of loss, and the attendant cost. Probability of loss is generally an empirical exercise, while cost has more to do with the ability of a reasonable person in possession of a copy of the insurance policy and a proof of loss associated with a claim presented under that policy to make a reasonably definite and objective evaluation of the amount of the loss recoverable as a result of the claim.
This summer, thousands of Americans will take to the road in their motorhomes. RV travel is becoming one of the most popular ways to vacation since it’s affordable, convenient, and fun. Gone are the days of having to buy an RV and maintain it just to take an occasional vacation; now, RV rental services make it easy for anyone on any budget to go RVing. But while the process of renting an RV is simple, there’s one aspect of it that’s a bit more of a conundrum: RV rental insurance. We’ve put together this guide for those of you who are wondering how to get RV rental insurance.

GEICO covers Type A motorhomes, Type B motorhomes, and Type C motorhomes, as well as other sports utility RVs. The coverage provides towable RV and travel trailer coverage including for conventional travel trailers, fifth-wheel travel trailers, travel trailers with expandable ends, and folding camper trailers and truck campers. The insurance also covers a toy-hauler if you are transporting a motorcycle or ATV.


You can get various levels of liability coverage for your RV, although many states often require that you have a minimum amount of coverage. However, that might not be enough to completely cover your liability in case you injure someone. So you might want to get more coverage by adding additional liability coverage to your policy or getting an umbrella policy that will provide you with additional general liability coverage.
You can get temporary coverage on your auto plan through an RV rental insurance rider (or binder - same thing). Not all auto insurance providers offer this, so you’ll have to give them a call to find out. Essentially, they’ll extend your auto insurance to cover the RV while you’re renting it. However, there’s a drawback to this: the limits may not be high enough to cover damage to a motorhome since motorhomes are so expensive. Furthermore, it won’t cover non-auto damage (if you break an appliance), and it won’t cover your personal property inside the RV. That’s why many people choose to buy insurance from a third party, like MBA insurance.
The first life insurance policies were taken out in the early 18th century. The first company to offer life insurance was the Amicable Society for a Perpetual Assurance Office, founded in London in 1706 by William Talbot and Sir Thomas Allen.[7][8] Edward Rowe Mores established the Society for Equitable Assurances on Lives and Survivorship in 1762.
Fifth-wheel trailers offer similar accommodations and amenities to those of Class A or Class C motorhomes, but are towed behind a vehicle, so you don’t have to take them everywhere you go. Toy haulers are basically mobile garages, they can be used to store things like cars, motorcycles, and snowmobiles. Horse trailers, just as the name suggests, are towable trailers used to carry horses or other animals. Cargo or utility trailers are towable metal boxes that are strictly used to store your belongings.
Many institutional insurance purchasers buy insurance through an insurance broker. While on the surface it appears the broker represents the buyer (not the insurance company), and typically counsels the buyer on appropriate coverage and policy limitations, in the vast majority of cases a broker's compensation comes in the form of a commission as a percentage of the insurance premium, creating a conflict of interest in that the broker's financial interest is tilted towards encouraging an insured to purchase more insurance than might be necessary at a higher price. A broker generally holds contracts with many insurers, thereby allowing the broker to "shop" the market for the best rates and coverage possible.
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“While some of the coverage an RV policy offers is similar to regular car insurance to cover accidents, you also need specific coverage that’s like property insurance because you essentially live in the vehicle when you’re using it,” says Gregory J. Blanchard, an associate vice president with Nationwide insurance in Des Moines, Iowa. “You also need liability insurance to protect you if someone trips and falls on your campsite or slips inside your RV.”
State Farm Bank ("Bank") is a Member FDIC and Equal Housing Lender. NMLS ID 139716. The other products offered by affiliate companies of State Farm Bank are not FDIC insured, not a State Farm Bank obligation or guaranteed by State Farm Bank, and may be subject to investment risk, including possible loss of principal invested. The Bank encourages any interested individual(s) to submit an application for any product(s) offered by the Bank. We also encourage you to obtain information regarding the Bank's underwriting standards for each type or credit or service offered by visiting statefarm.com® or by contacting the Bank at 877-SF4-BANK (877-734-2265). If you are deaf, hard of hearing, or do not use your voice to communicate, you may contact us via 711 or other relay services. To apply for a Bank product, you may also see your participating State Farm agent.
RV insurance covers many of the similar risks that auto insurance does, including collision, comprehensive and liability coverage. You can also get additional protection for your personal belongings on board, equipment and attached accessories such as awnings and satellite dishes. Depending on the insurance company you choose, your additional coverage options may include:
Bus-conversion homes are a popular and fast-growing trend within the RV lifestyle. City buses, Greyhounds, and even school buses are highly sought after and, once renovated, become non-traditional RVs that fall into the Class A category. While bus renovation projects are becoming mainstream, they can be difficult to insure. Buses, especially school bus-converted homes or “Skoolies,” are considered more of a risk due to their weight and balance limitations. Vehicles originally built for mass transportation do not have the same axle and weight distribution as traditional RVs, which are designed for sleeping and carrying additional living necessities.

Companies also needed to offer full-timer coverage for those who live year-round in their RV; full replacement coverage in the event the RV is totaled or stolen; personal belonging coverage for the property inside the RV, including electronics, appliances, and jewelry; vacation liability coverage for injuries that occur at the vacation site where the RV is parked; and permanently attached items coverage for items like satellite dishes, wheelchair lifts, or retractable canopies. Finally, companies also were required to cover most, if not all types of recreational vehicles.

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