Definite loss: The loss takes place at a known time, in a known place, and from a known cause. The classic example is death of an insured person on a life insurance policy. Fire, automobile accidents, and worker injuries may all easily meet this criterion. Other types of losses may only be definite in theory. Occupational disease, for instance, may involve prolonged exposure to injurious conditions where no specific time, place, or cause is identifiable. Ideally, the time, place, and cause of a loss should be clear enough that a reasonable person, with sufficient information, could objectively verify all three elements.
How much insurance you need, depends on what your priorities are. Obviously, if you took out a loan to purchase your RV, you want to make sure you are covered at full replacement or purchase value so that you can pay off your loan. You’ll also want to get uninsured and underinsured motorists protection in case someone hits you, and they can’t fully pay for your RV’s repair.

A common mistake that is made by RV owners is simply adding their recreational vehicle directly under their current auto policy instead of purchasing a specialty RV policy. Insuring your RV with an auto policy may leave you exposed to unpleasant surprises in the event that you need to file a claim. In most cases, a specialty RV policy costs less than an auto policy, even though it provides more comprehensive coverage. Give your RV the special protection it deserves, only available through a specialty RV carrier.
Captive insurance companies may be defined as limited-purpose insurance companies established with the specific objective of financing risks emanating from their parent group or groups. This definition can sometimes be extended to include some of the risks of the parent company's customers. In short, it is an in-house self-insurance vehicle. Captives may take the form of a "pure" entity (which is a 100% subsidiary of the self-insured parent company); of a "mutual" captive (which insures the collective risks of members of an industry); and of an "association" captive (which self-insures individual risks of the members of a professional, commercial or industrial association). Captives represent commercial, economic and tax advantages to their sponsors because of the reductions in costs they help create and for the ease of insurance risk management and the flexibility for cash flows they generate. Additionally, they may provide coverage of risks which is neither available nor offered in the traditional insurance market at reasonable prices.
Large number of similar exposure units: Since insurance operates through pooling resources, the majority of insurance policies are provided for individual members of large classes, allowing insurers to benefit from the law of large numbers in which predicted losses are similar to the actual losses. Exceptions include Lloyd's of London, which is famous for ensuring the life or health of actors, sports figures, and other famous individuals. However, all exposures will have particular differences, which may lead to different premium rates.
That’s because an RV is not just a vehicle – it’s often equal parts vehicle and home. For that reason, you might need insurance that includes coverage offered on homeowners insurance policies. You may need a policy that can cover emergency expenses like a hotel stay if your RV is totaled or being repaired. Given the fact that you are also traveling with your RV, you might need special coverage that allows you to travel across the country or in Mexico or Canada.
The amount of insurance your RV requires will mainly depend on the type of motorhome or towable you own, how often you use it, and whether you plan to reside in it for six or more months out of the year. There are two types of recreational vehicles, the towable trailer and the motorhome, which falls into three categories: Class A, B or C motorhomes. Class A motorhomes are the largest and tend to be the most expensive. They often include luxury features, customized amenities, and permanent attachments that may require additional protection. Class B vehicles are the smallest type of RV, also known as “camper vans,” and are generally much cheaper to insure than larger motorhomes. Class C vehicles are a hybrid of Class A and B.

The AARP Auto Insurance Program is underwritten by Hartford Fire Insurance Company and its affiliates, One Hartford Plaza, Hartford, CT 06155. It is underwritten in CA by Hartford Underwriters Insurance Company; in WA, by Hartford Casualty Insurance Company; in MN, by Sentinel Insurance Company; and in MA, MI and PA, by Trumbull Insurance Company. The AARP Homeowners Insurance Program from The Hartford is underwritten by Hartford Fire Insurance Company and its affiliates, One Hartford Plaza, Hartford, CT 06155. In CA, it is underwritten by Property and Casualty Insurance Company of Hartford; in WA, MI, MN, by Trumbull Insurance Company; in MA by Trumbull Insurance Company, Sentinel Insurance Company, Hartford Insurance Company of the Midwest, Hartford Accident and Indemnity Company; and in PA by Hartford Underwriters Insurance Company. Not available in all states, including FL. Specific features, credits and discounts may vary and may not be available in all states in accordance with state filings and applicable law. Applicants are individually underwritten and some may not qualify. Auto and Home are currently unavailable in Canada and U.S. Territories or possessions.
Choosing the lowest price/inadequate coverage. The lowest prices will typically leave you vulnerable on the back end; should an accident or collision occur, your lower premium will require you to spend much more out of pocket. The same goes for inadequate coverage. Specifically, don’t cut corners when it comes to liability coverage; instead, shop around for the provider that will protect you most while also catering to your needs, lifestyle, and budget.

Whether you plan on using your RV as a full-time home or for occasional road trips, insurance is a must. Adding your RV to an existing car insurance policy may be an option, but RVs are much more than just cars. For better financial protection, consider RV insurance. This coverage combines elements of auto and home insurance to account for the unique potential problems with a recreational vehicle.
Financed RVs are generally required by the financial lien-holder to carry full coverage because lenders want reimbursement on their loan in case of a loss. If you do not purchase full coverage, your lender could take out an insurance policy on the vehicle and send you the bill. Lender-purchased insurance typically comes with much higher premiums and no liability, so taking responsibility for your own insurance is a smart financial decision.
By the late 19th century governments began to initiate national insurance programs against sickness and old age. Germany built on a tradition of welfare programs in Prussia and Saxony that began as early as in the 1840s. In the 1880s Chancellor Otto von Bismarck introduced old age pensions, accident insurance and medical care that formed the basis for Germany's welfare state.[11][12] In Britain more extensive legislation was introduced by the Liberal government in the 1911 National Insurance Act. This gave the British working classes the first contributory system of insurance against illness and unemployment.[13] This system was greatly expanded after the Second World War under the influence of the Beveridge Report, to form the first modern welfare state.[11][14]
Bus-home conversions are a rapidly-growing trend that several RV insurance companies are adapting into their policies. The type of bus, however, is a prominent deciding factor in coverage, since bus axles differ from traditional RVs and aren’t built to carry a certain amount of weight. Many RV insurance companies avoid school bus-converted homes, as they have a higher risk of rollover accidents. Also, your bus-converted home must be registered as a recreational vehicle for personal use to be eligible for RV-insurance. Depending on the state where you register your vehicle, it may require your bus to comply with several requirements and meet certain standards before registration. It’s important that you check with your local department of motor vehicles beforehand.
However, there are some circumstances where RV insurance is always required, even if it’s a towable model. For example, if you’re renting or financing your RV, both renters and lenders will want to make sure that they’ll be properly reimbursed in case of an accident or loss, and will require you to acquire an insurance policy before allowing you to take them on the road.
We take pride in giving you the specialized RV insurance coverages that ordinary auto insurance doesn’t provide. We understand the RV lifestyle, and have designed features and benefits to give you security, flexibility and affordability. And if you do need to make a claim, we have exceptional RV protections like Optional Full Replacement Cost Coverage1 and a staff of knowledgeable RV claims professionals to ensure your complete satisfaction.
If you purchase a new travel trailer for $10,000 cash, insurance is optional because there's no finance company involved; however, you would probably still want to carry full coverage on it. A total loss, such as fire or theft, would be devastating to most people without insurance to cover the investment-loss costs of your RV. Determine the value of your RV versus the likelihood of a loss to before you decide to self-insure your travel trailer’s physical damage risk and see if it’s really worth it.
I am not sure about insurance outside of Texas but here in Texas we have Mutual insurance companies that are able to provide great coverage for a very low price compared to Good Sam, Progressive, GEICO ect. I get request from good sam regularly tell me that they can save me 3 to 4 hundred dollars a year and the insurance is tailored to motor homes and if I will ask for a quote they will send me a free gift. So I just send them my current coverage amounts and rates and they keep sending me screwdrivers. I use them for Xmas presents. My coverage is with Germania Farm Mutual out of Brenham, Texas. We have everything with them, home cars trucks, motor home, but they still want cover my motorcycle. Maybe they think I am too old.
When it comes to RV insurance, a lot of benefits might be more important than they seem. For example, emergency roadside assistance might be incredibly important if you have an older RV or plan to spend a lot of time on the road. Similarly, if you plan to travel to Mexico, you’ll want to get insurance that will cover you there. Other important policies include coverage for your personal belongings, permanent attachment coverage, and vacation liability coverage.

Many providers offer discounts as rewards for “good” customer behavior. Common ones include discounts for driving safely, paying your entire annual premium upfront, keeping your RV in storage for part of the year, switching from another provider, holding membership in an RV association, or taking an RV safety course. We noted if a provider listed generous discounts available to all customers. However, many discounts vary depending on location. To see if there are any specific to your area and to compare RV insurance prices, ask an agent.

Whether you are a Millennial or a Baby Boomer, if you have never traversed the tricky field of buying insurance for an RV, your best option is most likely going to be a reliable marketplace that can both inform and point users in the right direction. RVInsurance.com is just that kind of marketplace, featuring a wealth of helpful information pertaining to purchasing an RV, insuring it, and staying safe on the road.
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