Insuring travel trailers or fifth-wheel trailers (with a special hitch that's installed in the bed of a pickup truck) is generally less expensive than insuring a motorized RV, but premium charges still vary significantly based on state of residence and the size, age and market value of the trailer, plus frequency of use. The owner of a small, older fifth-wheel RV[4] valued at $8,000 reports paying about $170 a year for collision and comprehensive coverage; RV-Dreams.com reports that full-timer coverage[5] on a Keystone Cambridge fifth-wheel cost $896-$924 a year between 2005 and 2009; and RVersOnline.org estimates annual insurance costs of $1,300 a year for a luxury fifth wheel with a medium-duty truck, used 140 days a year.
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Traditionally, motorhomes have been very popular among baby boomers who take advantage of their retirement to travel and vacation. The Recreation Vehicle Industry Association estimates that 750,000 to one million retirees consider an RV their home. For many of these older RVers, their love of the outdoors stems from childhood camping and family trips.  

The point of owning an RV is to have the ability to travel from state to state in comfort, which means you'll need comprehensive and collision insurance as well as bodily injury, property damage liability coverage and uninsured motorist coverage that applies wherever you travel. Standard RV coverage isn’t much different from regular auto insurance, but the risks involved are potentially much higher since RVs cost more to fix and replace and the number of people traveling in the RV is likely to be higher than in a car.


Whether you plan on using your RV as a full-time home or for occasional road trips, insurance is a must. Adding your RV to an existing car insurance policy may be an option, but RVs are much more than just cars. For better financial protection, consider RV insurance. This coverage combines elements of auto and home insurance to account for the unique potential problems with a recreational vehicle.
National General Insurance rightfully calls itself America's RV insurance specialist, as they specialize in offering the customized coverages that regular auto insurance doesn't provide. Their specially designed features and benefits include items such as permanent attachments coverage, an emergency expense allowance, full-timer coverage, storage option and personal belongings coverage for full replacement cost up to $3,000. Their commitment to exceptional service is such that if their customers aren't satisfied with their claims service, National General will waive up to $250 off their deductible. Their coverages are specifically designed for the RV lifestyle, with an array of discounts available for multiple cars, GM/GMAC customers, safe drivers, on-star suscribers, among many others.

Part Time: If you only use your RV occasionally or part-time and do not live in it permanently, you would normally only want campsite or part time insurance. This kind of insurance policy will however also cover you for most of the benefits of a full time policy. The best product for part timers, is currently offered by Progressive RV insurance if the policyholders is also a member of USAA. 


That’s because an RV is not just a vehicle – it’s often equal parts vehicle and home. For that reason, you might need insurance that includes coverage offered on homeowners insurance policies. You may need a policy that can cover emergency expenses like a hotel stay if your RV is totaled or being repaired. Given the fact that you are also traveling with your RV, you might need special coverage that allows you to travel across the country or in Mexico or Canada.
What if there is a theft in my motor home, such as jewelry, DVD player, or clothing? Typically they are not going to cover these personal belongings. Homeowners policies typically place strict limits on off-premises coverage and require a sizable deductible to be paid first. Foremost provides optional comprehensive coverage for personal belongings and in most cases don't require a deductible. This way you can take your valuables with you on the road and be covered.

When insured parties experience a loss for a specified peril, the coverage entitles the policyholder to make a claim against the insurer for the covered amount of loss as specified by the policy. The fee paid by the insured to the insurer for assuming the risk is called the premium. Insurance premiums from many insureds are used to fund accounts reserved for later payment of claims – in theory for a relatively few claimants – and for overhead costs. So long as an insurer maintains adequate funds set aside for anticipated losses (called reserves), the remaining margin is an insurer's profit.
Many baby boomers are doing the same: spending their retirement visiting national parks, historic landmarks, and exploring the country. Empty nesters and the 55+ crowd find that RV living offers both freedom and a strong sense of community. Contrary to the popular belief that RVers are constantly on the move, RV and manufactured home parks also serve as seasonal homes, with plenty of things to do to keep an active lifestyle.
The cheapest average rate for motorhome insurance can be found in North Carolina, with a median annual premium of $860. Oregon is second to the lowest for RV insurance rates statewide. This is due to a number of factors including fewer high-cost motorhomes. Oregon is followed by Massachusetts, which is at a median annual premium of $1,128. The insurance market in Massachusetts is very competitive; insurance companies woo consumers with reduced rates.
Insurance terms, definitions and explanations are intended for informational purposes only and do not in any way replace or modify the definitions and information contained in individual insurance contracts, policies or declaration pages, which are controlling. Such terms and availability may vary by state and exclusions may apply. Discounts may not be applied to all policy coverages.
What if my motor home breaks down and I am stranded? A typical auto policy may not pay for housing or extra travel expenses, while you are waiting, or to get you home. A Foremost policy offers outstanding emergency expense coverage. We will pay for temporary housing, travel expenses to get you home. We will even pay to transport your damaged motor home to your home, a repair center, or a storage facility.
Whether you are a Millennial or a Baby Boomer, if you have never traversed the tricky field of buying insurance for an RV, your best option is most likely going to be a reliable marketplace that can both inform and point users in the right direction. RVInsurance.com is just that kind of marketplace, featuring a wealth of helpful information pertaining to purchasing an RV, insuring it, and staying safe on the road.
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