For example, most insurance policies in the English language today have been carefully drafted in plain English; the industry learned the hard way that many courts will not enforce policies against insureds when the judges themselves cannot understand what the policies are saying. Typically, courts construe ambiguities in insurance policies against the insurance company and in favor of coverage under the policy.
An entity seeking to transfer risk (an individual, corporation, or association of any type, etc.) becomes the 'insured' party once risk is assumed by an 'insurer', the insuring party, by means of a contract, called an insurance policy. Generally, an insurance contract includes, at a minimum, the following elements: identification of participating parties (the insurer, the insured, the beneficiaries), the premium, the period of coverage, the particular loss event covered, the amount of coverage (i.e., the amount to be paid to the insured or beneficiary in the event of a loss), and exclusions (events not covered). An insured is thus said to be "indemnified" against the loss covered in the policy.
How much you’ll pay will depend on factors like how much you use your RV, how much coverage you want, your driving record, and your age. You may qualify for one of their discounts. For example, you can get a discount if you pay in full, if you have completed a defensive driving course, have OnStar, have low mileage, are a member of an affinity organization that provides a discount, or have multiple vehicles insured with National General.
These Progressive RV insurance policies cover well all the expected perils. In some states, they could be incuding hurricanes and tornados. Here, they cover events other than collisions and includes things like damage from: theft, vandalism, fire, falling objects, floods, storms, and other natural disasters. As with any other type of coverage, check your policy limits to know how much you are covered for.
While some auto insurance policies extend liability coverage for towable RVs, they are still significantly large investments, especially if your RV is financed or is a motorhome in which you live. Most RVs contain personal belongings, home essentials, and attachments, all of which require coverage beyond what’s offered in a basic car insurance policy. For this reason, RV insurance usually has comprehensive coverage plans, which covers personal injury, theft, and natural disasters in addition to liability. RV insurance providers also offer a variety of specialized coverage options.

You may wonder whether RV insurance is necessary. However, if you fail to purchase it, you may be facing a rather unpleasant ordeal. In many cases, the homeowner’s and auto policies you have won’t be enough to cover RV components, such as the accessories, plumbing, or appliances. Without a true RV policy, any emergency expenses you incur while you travel are going to have to come from your own pocket.

You can get various levels of liability coverage for your RV, although many states often require that you have a minimum amount of coverage. However, that might not be enough to completely cover your liability in case you injure someone. So you might want to get more coverage by adding additional liability coverage to your policy or getting an umbrella policy that will provide you with additional general liability coverage.

Class A motorhomes are the largest and most expensive category of motorized RV. Premium costs depend on the motorhome's age, size and value, and frequency of use. RVersOnline.org[1] estimates average insurance costs of $1,000-$1,300 a year for a gas-powered Class A motorhome used 140 days each year. And a Mississippi resident[2] pays $1,200-$1,400 a year to insure a 1994 motorhome used 30-150 days each year, while the owner of a 2000 Itasca Suncruiser pays $500 a year with a $500 deductible.
Bankrate.com is an independent, advertising-supported publisher and comparison service. Bankrate is compensated in exchange for featured placement of sponsored products and services, or your clicking on links posted on this website. This compensation may impact how, where and in what order products appear. Bankrate.com does not include all companies or all available products.
The minimum liability requirements vary from state to state, with most requiring only $50,000 in bodily injury coverage and $25,000 in property damage. However, to make sure you’re fully covered in case of an accident, we recommend policies that provide much more than the minimum. With this in mind, providers that featured a greater selection of coverage options with higher liability limits across the board ranked higher with us.
×