According to the Insurance Information Institute’s table of Automobile Financial Responsibility Laws by State, 49 out of all 50 states, as well as the District of Columbia, require you to have some sort of liability coverage for all vehicles on the road, including RVs. The only exception to this rule is the state of New Hampshire, which has no mandatory insurance law, and only requires financial responsibility from the person at fault in a car accident.
The amount of insurance your RV requires will mainly depend on the type of motorhome or towable you own, how often you use it, and whether you plan to reside in it for six or more months out of the year. There are two types of recreational vehicles, the towable trailer and the motorhome, which falls into three categories: Class A, B or C motorhomes. Class A motorhomes are the largest and tend to be the most expensive. They often include luxury features, customized amenities, and permanent attachments that may require additional protection. Class B vehicles are the smallest type of RV, also known as “camper vans,” and are generally much cheaper to insure than larger motorhomes. Class C vehicles are a hybrid of Class A and B.

You may wonder whether RV insurance is necessary. However, if you fail to purchase it, you may be facing a rather unpleasant ordeal. In many cases, the homeowner’s and auto policies you have won’t be enough to cover RV components, such as the accessories, plumbing, or appliances. Without a true RV policy, any emergency expenses you incur while you travel are going to have to come from your own pocket.
Further examples are the company’s storage option and low mileage discount—both great solutions for part-time RVers. Baby Boomers are more likely to own a home and those that were born between 1946 and 1964 are now heading into retirement. This makes them more prone to RV part-time rather than full-time when compared to Millennials, for example. Some Baby Boomers end up making their RVs a home-on-wheels, but many are also likely to take their RV out for vacation with their families, or to explore the great outdoors for certain seasons or periods of time.
The company’s personal belongings coverage protects items, from laptops and linens to attachments and accessories, up to $3,000. Customer belongings are insured for what they paid and not a depreciated amount. They also have the option of adding more coverage if needed. The permanent attachments coverage works similarly, automatically ensuring any items attached—such as awnings, satellite dishes, and TV antennas—for the full amount it would cost to replace them instead of a depreciated amount.
I am not sure about insurance outside of Texas but here in Texas we have Mutual insurance companies that are able to provide great coverage for a very low price compared to Good Sam, Progressive, GEICO ect. I get request from good sam regularly tell me that they can save me 3 to 4 hundred dollars a year and the insurance is tailored to motor homes and if I will ask for a quote they will send me a free gift. So I just send them my current coverage amounts and rates and they keep sending me screwdrivers. I use them for Xmas presents. My coverage is with Germania Farm Mutual out of Brenham, Texas. We have everything with them, home cars trucks, motor home, but they still want cover my motorcycle. Maybe they think I am too old.
Insurers will often use insurance agents to initially market or underwrite their customers. Agents can be captive, meaning they write only for one company, or independent, meaning that they can issue policies from several companies. The existence and success of companies using insurance agents is likely due to improved and personalized service. Companies also use Broking firms, Banks and other corporate entities (like Self Help Groups, Microfinance Institutions, NGOs, etc.) to market their products.[30]
On average, RV insurance for a motor home costs around $600 a year and insurance for a nonmotorized trailer costs around $300 a year. The specific cost of your RV insurance will depend on your RV. Insurance on a $10,000 nonmotorized trailer will cost significantly less than insurance for a $200,000 luxury RV, for instance. In general, though, expect your RV insurance to cost less than your car insurance.
Good Sam shows an outstanding number of positive reviews on Birdeye, a platform which the company uses in order to get first-hand customer feedback that is both relevant and reliable. On the platform, customer satisfaction relating to its products and services hovers at around 96%. The company is also accredited with the Better Business Bureau, where it currently holds an excellent A+ rating.
×