Smaller non-motorized RVs might need only standard auto insurance. In general a truck camper (a separate unit that slides into the bed of a pickup truck) costs less to insure than large trailers, because the pickup is usually already insured and the camper unit is considered cargo that can be covered with a relatively inexpensive rider to the auto insurance. Popup tent trailers are also relatively inexpensive to add to an existing auto insurance policy, and any theft of personal items when camping may be covered under homeowner's insurance.
The amount of insurance your RV requires will mainly depend on the type of motorhome or towable you own, how often you use it, and whether you plan to reside in it for six or more months out of the year. There are two types of recreational vehicles, the towable trailer and the motorhome, which falls into three categories: Class A, B or C motorhomes. Class A motorhomes are the largest and tend to be the most expensive. They often include luxury features, customized amenities, and permanent attachments that may require additional protection. Class B vehicles are the smallest type of RV, also known as “camper vans,” and are generally much cheaper to insure than larger motorhomes. Class C vehicles are a hybrid of Class A and B.
On average, an at-fault property damage accident will raise your premium by an average of $612 per year. Because most insurance providers will charge you for three years after an accident, this $612 increase equates to more than $1,800 in total fees. If you’re thinking of filing a claim, consider the overall cost of the claim versus what the claim would cost to pay out of pocket. Compare this $1,837 penalty — plus your deductible (if applicable) — to the out-of-pocket expense. While this is nice information to know before filing a claim, it won’t help if you’ve already filed a claim. If you have an at-fault accident on your insurance history, consider USAA or State Farm.

When insured parties experience a loss for a specified peril, the coverage entitles the policyholder to make a claim against the insurer for the covered amount of loss as specified by the policy. The fee paid by the insured to the insurer for assuming the risk is called the premium. Insurance premiums from many insureds are used to fund accounts reserved for later payment of claims – in theory for a relatively few claimants – and for overhead costs. So long as an insurer maintains adequate funds set aside for anticipated losses (called reserves), the remaining margin is an insurer's profit.
Class A motorhomes are the largest and most expensive category of motorized RV. Premium costs depend on the motorhome's age, size and value, and frequency of use. RVersOnline.org[1] estimates average insurance costs of $1,000-$1,300 a year for a gas-powered Class A motorhome used 140 days each year. And a Mississippi resident[2] pays $1,200-$1,400 a year to insure a 1994 motorhome used 30-150 days each year, while the owner of a 2000 Itasca Suncruiser pays $500 a year with a $500 deductible.
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Your location can have a huge impact on your insurance premium. Like many industries in the US, car insurance is regulated at the state level and is dictated by each state’s regulations. If you live in an area prone to floods, hurricanes, or wildfires, your rate will be elevated, as insurance companies compensate for these risks. Dive into the data below to find check out your expected costs with our list of car insurance rates by city.
In determining premiums and premium rate structures, insurers consider quantifiable factors, including location, credit scores, gender, occupation, marital status, and education level. However, the use of such factors is often considered to be unfair or unlawfully discriminatory, and the reaction against this practice has in some instances led to political disputes about the ways in which insurers determine premiums and regulatory intervention to limit the factors used.

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Some communities prefer to create virtual insurance amongst themselves by other means than contractual risk transfer, which assigns explicit numerical values to risk. A number of religious groups, including the Amish and some Muslim groups, depend on support provided by their communities when disasters strike. The risk presented by any given person is assumed collectively by the community who all bear the cost of rebuilding lost property and supporting people whose needs are suddenly greater after a loss of some kind. In supportive communities where others can be trusted to follow community leaders, this tacit form of insurance can work. In this manner the community can even out the extreme differences in insurability that exist among its members. Some further justification is also provided by invoking the moral hazard of explicit insurance contracts.

When insured parties experience a loss for a specified peril, the coverage entitles the policyholder to make a claim against the insurer for the covered amount of loss as specified by the policy. The fee paid by the insured to the insurer for assuming the risk is called the premium. Insurance premiums from many insureds are used to fund accounts reserved for later payment of claims – in theory for a relatively few claimants – and for overhead costs. So long as an insurer maintains adequate funds set aside for anticipated losses (called reserves), the remaining margin is an insurer's profit.


The company’s personal belongings coverage protects items, from laptops and linens to attachments and accessories, up to $3,000. Customer belongings are insured for what they paid and not a depreciated amount. They also have the option of adding more coverage if needed. The permanent attachments coverage works similarly, automatically ensuring any items attached—such as awnings, satellite dishes, and TV antennas—for the full amount it would cost to replace them instead of a depreciated amount.
As the name suggests, DRIVE Insurance offers protection for items that move including cars, motorcycles, ATVs and dirt bikes. They also offer insurance policies for scooters and golf carts. Most states require that drivers carry a minimum amount of auto insurance coverage, however, that minimum varies by state. With DRIVE Insurance, customers can opt for basic coverage or increase policy limits for fuller protection.

Still, regardless of whether your state requires you to have an RV insurance policy, it’s always best to have one if you plan on living in your RV full-time to protect yourself and your vehicle against any damages and covered losses. On the other hand, if you plan on using your RV seasonally or for short trips, then liability coverage might be enough.
When it comes to RV insurance, a lot of benefits might be more important than they seem. For example, emergency roadside assistance might be incredibly important if you have an older RV or plan to spend a lot of time on the road. Similarly, if you plan to travel to Mexico, you’ll want to get insurance that will cover you there. Other important policies include coverage for your personal belongings, permanent attachment coverage, and vacation liability coverage.
An entity seeking to transfer risk (an individual, corporation, or association of any type, etc.) becomes the 'insured' party once risk is assumed by an 'insurer', the insuring party, by means of a contract, called an insurance policy. Generally, an insurance contract includes, at a minimum, the following elements: identification of participating parties (the insurer, the insured, the beneficiaries), the premium, the period of coverage, the particular loss event covered, the amount of coverage (i.e., the amount to be paid to the insured or beneficiary in the event of a loss), and exclusions (events not covered). An insured is thus said to be "indemnified" against the loss covered in the policy.
Regardless of how often you use your RV, Safeco is worth a look. Safeco offers coverage for anyone who lives in an RV fewer than 250 days (about eight months). While this won’t cover policyholders who live in their RV full-time, it serves as a nice middle-ground for people who only plan to store their RV away during the winter months, for instance.

RV Insurance companies take these type of risk factors into account, which makes it more difficult for bus-conversion homeowners to find the best coverage. Also, buses first need to be registered as RVs with the department of motor vehicles beforehand. If not, they’re still considered commercial vehicles instead of personal, and will not qualify for RV insurance. Different states have different requirements as to what qualifies as an RV, many of which include repainting the bus a different color, having a potable water supply, installing a toilet, and having cooking appliances onboard.
The most popular term life insurance option on the market, the 20 year term policy provides longer coverage than its shorter-term 10 year counterpart, though it comes with higher annual rates. These policies are usually recommended for young families who often have large debts and expenses, like mortgages and school loans, that would become extremely burdensome if the breadwinner of the family happened to die unexpectedly. Twenty years is typically long enough for the family to substantially pay down these debts and reduce the potential risk of someone else having to foot the bill should something happen. Take a look at the average cost by Rate Class below:
While competition certainly helps keep premiums in check, it’s not the only factor. “In addition, under Virginia’s laws for seeking recovery, the person at fault for causing a car accident is held responsible for any resulting harm,” says Schrad. “Virginia also requires uninsured motorist coverage as part of a driver’s own auto insurance plan in case they are involved in an accident with an uninsured driver,” he continues. Not all states require drivers to carry uninsured motorist coverage.
Insurance is offered by Safeco Insurance Company of America and/or its affiliates, with their principal place of business at 175 Berkeley Street, Boston, Massachusetts, 02116. This website provides a simplified description of coverage. Nothing stated herein creates a contract. All statements made are subject to the provisions, exclusions, conditions and limitations of the applicable insurance policy. Please refer to actual policy forms for complete details regarding the coverage discussed. If the information in these materials conflicts with the policy language that it describes, the policy language prevails. Coverages and features not available in all states. Eligibility is subject to meeting applicable underwriting criteria.
When you rent an RV, the company will almost always provide some type of liability coverage. This protects you against third party claims. You’ll also get roadside assistance in case you break down while you’re on the road. However, you still need to have RV rental insurance coverage, which covers other situations that don’t fall under liability coverage. You have a few options to get RV rental insurance:
Burial insurance is a very old type of life insurance which is paid out upon death to cover final expenses, such as the cost of a funeral. The Greeks and Romans introduced burial insurance c. 600 CE when they organized guilds called "benevolent societies" which cared for the surviving families and paid funeral expenses of members upon death. Guilds in the Middle Ages served a similar purpose, as did friendly societies during Victorian times.
We take pride in giving you the specialized RV insurance coverages that ordinary auto insurance doesn’t provide. We understand the RV lifestyle, and have designed features and benefits to give you security, flexibility and affordability. And if you do need to make a claim, we have exceptional RV protections like Optional Full Replacement Cost Coverage1 and a staff of knowledgeable RV claims professionals to ensure your complete satisfaction.
Liability insurance usually includes bodily injury coverage and property damage coverage. Bodily injury coverage is designed to cover all of the other party’s medical expenses resulting from any injuries received in an accident for which you’re at fault, while property damage coverage helps cover the costs of any damage to another person’s property, such as vehicle repairs, replacements, or damaged structures resulting from said accident.

At the most basic level, initial ratemaking involves looking at the frequency and severity of insured perils and the expected average payout resulting from these perils. Thereafter an insurance company will collect historical loss data, bring the loss data to present value, and compare these prior losses to the premium collected in order to assess rate adequacy.[24] Loss ratios and expense loads are also used. Rating for different risk characteristics involves at the most basic level comparing the losses with "loss relativities"—a policy with twice as many losses would therefore be charged twice as much. More complex multivariate analyses are sometimes used when multiple characteristics are involved and a univariate analysis could produce confounded results. Other statistical methods may be used in assessing the probability of future losses.
Both part-timers and full-timers can find coverage geared towards their type of RVing. Part-timers can opt for Progressive’s vacation liability coverage, which offers up to $10,000, with an upgrade of up to $500,000 if someone is hurt in or around their RV while they are on vacation, and emergency expense coverage, which provides $750 for transportation and hotel costs plus meals, again, if they are on vacation. Full-timers can enhance their coverage with Progressive’s full timer’s personal liability, replacement cost of personal effects, and total loss coverages.
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