This summer, thousands of Americans will take to the road in their motorhomes. RV travel is becoming one of the most popular ways to vacation since it’s affordable, convenient, and fun. Gone are the days of having to buy an RV and maintain it just to take an occasional vacation; now, RV rental services make it easy for anyone on any budget to go RVing. But while the process of renting an RV is simple, there’s one aspect of it that’s a bit more of a conundrum: RV rental insurance. We’ve put together this guide for those of you who are wondering how to get RV rental insurance.
According to Greg Gerber, “Most car insurance firms don’t have a clue of what can go wrong with an RV and don’t provide the coverage to get it fixed adequately,” which is why he advises consumers to get a separate policy for their RVs instead of bundling, to “avoid the hassle that can come if the RV itself is broken and they’re trying to get their car insurance company to fix it.” 
The coverage options that Good Sam’s Full Time RV Insurance provides include but are not limited to: personal liability, which is similar to vacation liability and pays for injuries that happen around the RV or on the customer’s property; medical payments to others, which covers the costs of medical expenses incurred by those who are injured while visiting the RV and/or the property around it; personal belongings coverage, which provides up to $3,000 of full replacement cost coverage at no extra cost; and an emergency expense allowance, which covers the costs of food and lodging if the customer is ever involved in a covered claim more than 100 miles from their home.
Each insurance company evaluates personal factors in its own way, and they keep their methods as hidden as possible. So we can’t tell you which company puts high value in your occupation or emphasizes a clean driving history more than others. But to help you get going, we can show you a car insurance rate comparison for the same hypothetical driver and car, using average rates from across the country.
We had National General on all our vehicles. In Sept 2015 I had my first chargeable accident since high school (I'm 70 today, Jan 11th). At that time they did as required by Federal regs and made themselves first payer on my wife since she complained of neck pain. In March 2016 I changed vehicle insurance to The Hartford. National General didn't inform us that they were primary payee so when my DW died in August ALL her medical bills were rejected. Took me three months, many letters and phone calls to get National General to remove themselves from the Medicare. In fact even now bills are still not correct!
Companies also needed to offer full-timer coverage for those who live year-round in their RV; full replacement coverage in the event the RV is totaled or stolen; personal belonging coverage for the property inside the RV, including electronics, appliances, and jewelry; vacation liability coverage for injuries that occur at the vacation site where the RV is parked; and permanently attached items coverage for items like satellite dishes, wheelchair lifts, or retractable canopies. Finally, companies also were required to cover most, if not all types of recreational vehicles.
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