Accidental loss: The event that constitutes the trigger of a claim should be fortuitous, or at least outside the control of the beneficiary of the insurance. The loss should be pure, in the sense that it results from an event for which there is only the opportunity for cost. Events that contain speculative elements such as ordinary business risks or even purchasing a lottery ticket are generally not considered insurable.


Builder's risk insurance insures against the risk of physical loss or damage to property during construction. Builder's risk insurance is typically written on an "all risk" basis covering damage arising from any cause (including the negligence of the insured) not otherwise expressly excluded. Builder's risk insurance is coverage that protects a person's or organization's insurable interest in materials, fixtures or equipment being used in the construction or renovation of a building or structure should those items sustain physical loss or damage from an insured peril.[32]
For example, most insurance policies in the English language today have been carefully drafted in plain English; the industry learned the hard way that many courts will not enforce policies against insureds when the judges themselves cannot understand what the policies are saying. Typically, courts construe ambiguities in insurance policies against the insurance company and in favor of coverage under the policy.
Definite loss: The loss takes place at a known time, in a known place, and from a known cause. The classic example is death of an insured person on a life insurance policy. Fire, automobile accidents, and worker injuries may all easily meet this criterion. Other types of losses may only be definite in theory. Occupational disease, for instance, may involve prolonged exposure to injurious conditions where no specific time, place, or cause is identifiable. Ideally, the time, place, and cause of a loss should be clear enough that a reasonable person, with sufficient information, could objectively verify all three elements.
Nationwide offers discounts if, for example, you have multiple vehicles insured with them, you’ve taken an RV driving course, you belong to an RV club like the National RV Association, you pay for your coverage in full, or you’re a good driver who is accident-free for 36 months. You can also score discounts if you have prior insurance on an RV, you renew with no claims, or you’re a member of certain qualifying organizations.
The coverage options that Good Sam’s Full Time RV Insurance provides include but are not limited to: personal liability, which is similar to vacation liability and pays for injuries that happen around the RV or on the customer’s property; medical payments to others, which covers the costs of medical expenses incurred by those who are injured while visiting the RV and/or the property around it; personal belongings coverage, which provides up to $3,000 of full replacement cost coverage at no extra cost; and an emergency expense allowance, which covers the costs of food and lodging if the customer is ever involved in a covered claim more than 100 miles from their home.
The state of Michigan has the highest overall RV insurance rates with a median premium of $4,510 per year and $375 per month. Why is RV Insurance In Michigan So Expensive? Michigan has mandatory laws that force RV Owners to purchase PIP (Personal Injury Protection Insurance Coverage), which makes the RV Insurance agencies cost for your Insurance claim more expensive. Louisiana comes in 2nd place with a median premium of 2,890 per year and $248.80 per month.
Choosing the lowest price/inadequate coverage. The lowest prices will typically leave you vulnerable on the back end; should an accident or collision occur, your lower premium will require you to spend much more out of pocket. The same goes for inadequate coverage. Specifically, don’t cut corners when it comes to liability coverage; instead, shop around for the provider that will protect you most while also catering to your needs, lifestyle, and budget.
Traditionally, motorhomes have been very popular among baby boomers who take advantage of their retirement to travel and vacation. The Recreation Vehicle Industry Association estimates that 750,000 to one million retirees consider an RV their home. For many of these older RVers, their love of the outdoors stems from childhood camping and family trips.  

When it comes to RV insurance, a lot of benefits might be more important than they seem. For example, emergency roadside assistance might be incredibly important if you have an older RV or plan to spend a lot of time on the road. Similarly, if you plan to travel to Mexico, you’ll want to get insurance that will cover you there. Other important policies include coverage for your personal belongings, permanent attachment coverage, and vacation liability coverage.

About the coverages described on this site: Your insurance contract is contained only in your policy, not in this website. Your insurance protection may vary from the coverages described here, depending on the standard coverages included in your policy and the optional coverages you purchase. Credit is only used by underwriting or rating where allowed by state law. We use credit-based insurance scoring in some cases. *Coverage may not be available in all areas.


Enjoying your time camping, exploring, and cruising the open road in your RV is more fun when you have the necessary insurance coverage. Along with essential liability protection, we also offer a full range of additional coverage options to further protect your family, your personal property, and your investment. Our independent agents are here to help you choose just the right policy for your needs whether you use your RV on weekends only or are out and about for months at a time.

When it comes to personal property coverage, you might want to get cash value coverage on your valuables. Or maybe full replacement value coverage is best for you. The best way to know if you have enough coverage is to imagine the worst-case scenarios and think about what you would do if they happened. Extra insurance can protect you if you don’t have significant personal savings.

Companies also needed to offer full-timer coverage for those who live year-round in their RV; full replacement coverage in the event the RV is totaled or stolen; personal belonging coverage for the property inside the RV, including electronics, appliances, and jewelry; vacation liability coverage for injuries that occur at the vacation site where the RV is parked; and permanently attached items coverage for items like satellite dishes, wheelchair lifts, or retractable canopies. Finally, companies also were required to cover most, if not all types of recreational vehicles.

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