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The insurance industry in China was nationalized in 1949 and thereafter offered by only a single state-owned company, the People's Insurance Company of China, which was eventually suspended as demand declined in a communist environment. In 1978, market reforms led to an increase in the market and by 1995 a comprehensive Insurance Law of the People's Republic of China[52] was passed, followed in 1998 by the formation of China Insurance Regulatory Commission (CIRC), which has broad regulatory authority over the insurance market of China.[53]

Location is important when it comes to RV insurance because it determines how likely your RV would experience theft or vandalism, or get damaged by a natural phenomenon like hail or a bad storm. Your RV insurance rate is based on your permanent address, so even if you spend most the time on the open road in your RV, you will still be charged based on where you live.


An entity seeking to transfer risk (an individual, corporation, or association of any type, etc.) becomes the 'insured' party once risk is assumed by an 'insurer', the insuring party, by means of a contract, called an insurance policy. Generally, an insurance contract includes, at a minimum, the following elements: identification of participating parties (the insurer, the insured, the beneficiaries), the premium, the period of coverage, the particular loss event covered, the amount of coverage (i.e., the amount to be paid to the insured or beneficiary in the event of a loss), and exclusions (events not covered). An insured is thus said to be "indemnified" against the loss covered in the policy.


National General’s mechanical breakdown service provides coverage for up to one hour of labor at the site of a breakdown. Vehicles will be towed to the nearest RV repair facility without dollar or mileage limits. Additionally, once their RV has been repaired after a claim, the company re-inspects it upon request in order to ensure it is in top condition.

Many institutional insurance purchasers buy insurance through an insurance broker. While on the surface it appears the broker represents the buyer (not the insurance company), and typically counsels the buyer on appropriate coverage and policy limitations, in the vast majority of cases a broker's compensation comes in the form of a commission as a percentage of the insurance premium, creating a conflict of interest in that the broker's financial interest is tilted towards encouraging an insured to purchase more insurance than might be necessary at a higher price. A broker generally holds contracts with many insurers, thereby allowing the broker to "shop" the market for the best rates and coverage possible.
Further examples are the company’s storage option and low mileage discount—both great solutions for part-time RVers. Baby Boomers are more likely to own a home and those that were born between 1946 and 1964 are now heading into retirement. This makes them more prone to RV part-time rather than full-time when compared to Millennials, for example. Some Baby Boomers end up making their RVs a home-on-wheels, but many are also likely to take their RV out for vacation with their families, or to explore the great outdoors for certain seasons or periods of time.
Fifth-wheel trailers offer similar accommodations and amenities to those of Class A or Class C motorhomes, but are towed behind a vehicle, so you don’t have to take them everywhere you go. Toy haulers are basically mobile garages, they can be used to store things like cars, motorcycles, and snowmobiles. Horse trailers, just as the name suggests, are towable trailers used to carry horses or other animals. Cargo or utility trailers are towable metal boxes that are strictly used to store your belongings.

If the open road is calling you and a recreational vehicle, or RV, is the way you want to go, it may be smart to hitch on some RV insurance. While some owners opt to cover their RV with an endorsement on their auto insurance policy, insurance companies including Progressive, Nationwide, Geico and GMAC offer specialized RV insurance that resembles a combination of car insurance, home or renters insurance, and travel insurance rolled into one policy.
An insurance provider and you might not consider your RV to be worth the same. By settling on an agreed value with your potential RV insurance provider, you are ensuring that both you and your insurance company have the same value of your RV in mind if you face a worst-case scenario—the total loss of your RV. It’s also important to ask about the next lower threshold for an agreed value premium. By agreeing to a slightly lower level of coverage, you might be able to save plenty on your premiums.
Nationwide’s RV insurance covers bodily injury liability, property damage liability, collision, comprehensive, uninsured motorist, underinsured motorists, and medical payments. In addition to that, you can get optional coverage for roadside assistance, labor and towing, vacation liability, safety glass replacement, replacement cost and scheduled personal effects, safety glass replacement, and the replacement cost of personal effects and scheduled personal effects.
Companies also needed to offer full-timer coverage for those who live year-round in their RV; full replacement coverage in the event the RV is totaled or stolen; personal belonging coverage for the property inside the RV, including electronics, appliances, and jewelry; vacation liability coverage for injuries that occur at the vacation site where the RV is parked; and permanently attached items coverage for items like satellite dishes, wheelchair lifts, or retractable canopies. Finally, companies also were required to cover most, if not all types of recreational vehicles.
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