To "indemnify" means to make whole again, or to be reinstated to the position that one was in, to the extent possible, prior to the happening of a specified event or peril. Accordingly, life insurance is generally not considered to be indemnity insurance, but rather "contingent" insurance (i.e., a claim arises on the occurrence of a specified event). There are generally three types of insurance contracts that seek to indemnify an insured:
^ Anzovin, Steven, Famous First Facts 2000, item # 2422, H. W. Wilson Company, ISBN 0-8242-0958-3 p. 121 The first life insurance company known of record was founded in 1706 by the Bishop of Oxford and the financier Thomas Allen in London, England. The company, called the Amicable Society for a Perpetual Assurance Office, collected annual premiums from policyholders and paid the nominees of deceased members from a common fund.

Motorhome  Tab 1 of 5 - (Press Enter to hear more about motorhomes) Pop-up Camper  Tab 2 of 5 - (Press Enter to hear more about Pop-up Campers) Fifth Wheel Trailer Tab 3 of 5 - (Press Enter to hear more about Fifth Wheel Trailers) Slide-on Camper  Tab 4 of 5 - (Press Enter to hear more about Slide-on Campers) Travel Trailer  Tab 5 of 5 - (Press Enter to hear more about Travel Trailers)
Farmers offers coverage for travel trailers and fifth wheel trailers in addition to RVs, as well as a special program for customers who use them as part- or full-time residences. The Stationary Travel Trailer Program offers comprehensive, liability, and medical payments coverage for customers who reside in their trailer seasonally or permanently. All of Farmers’ optional coverage options for RVs also apply for trailers. What’s more, if your trailer is towable, Farmers will insure your tow vehicle.
Whether RV insurance is optional or required, be aware of the pitfalls of going without RV insurance. Lots of RV owners leave their RVs parked out in the open yard, leaving them susceptible to storm damage, vandalism, and possible theft. If your RV holds a great deal of value, make sure to purchase full coverage RV insurance to protect against a potential loss.
When it comes to RV insurance, a lot of benefits might be more important than they seem. For example, emergency roadside assistance might be incredibly important if you have an older RV or plan to spend a lot of time on the road. Similarly, if you plan to travel to Mexico, you’ll want to get insurance that will cover you there. Other important policies include coverage for your personal belongings, permanent attachment coverage, and vacation liability coverage.
For this review, we focused on national providers and left out any companies that only insure RVs locally. Odds are, national insurers are able to provide coverage no matter where you are in the U.S., and they are more likely to have the financial strength to support you. If you’re trusting a provider to come through when you’re most in need, it’s reassuring to have a company with years of experience and a history of financial success at your back.

Whether you are a Millennial or a Baby Boomer, if you have never traversed the tricky field of buying insurance for an RV, your best option is most likely going to be a reliable marketplace that can both inform and point users in the right direction. RVInsurance.com is just that kind of marketplace, featuring a wealth of helpful information pertaining to purchasing an RV, insuring it, and staying safe on the road.
About the coverages described on this site: Your insurance contract is contained only in your policy, not in this website. Your insurance protection may vary from the coverages described here, depending on the standard coverages included in your policy and the optional coverages you purchase. Credit is only used by underwriting or rating where allowed by state law. We use credit-based insurance scoring in some cases. *Coverage may not be available in all areas.
Captive insurance companies may be defined as limited-purpose insurance companies established with the specific objective of financing risks emanating from their parent group or groups. This definition can sometimes be extended to include some of the risks of the parent company's customers. In short, it is an in-house self-insurance vehicle. Captives may take the form of a "pure" entity (which is a 100% subsidiary of the self-insured parent company); of a "mutual" captive (which insures the collective risks of members of an industry); and of an "association" captive (which self-insures individual risks of the members of a professional, commercial or industrial association). Captives represent commercial, economic and tax advantages to their sponsors because of the reductions in costs they help create and for the ease of insurance risk management and the flexibility for cash flows they generate. Additionally, they may provide coverage of risks which is neither available nor offered in the traditional insurance market at reasonable prices.
Liability insurance usually includes bodily injury coverage and property damage coverage. Bodily injury coverage is designed to cover all of the other party’s medical expenses resulting from any injuries received in an accident for which you’re at fault, while property damage coverage helps cover the costs of any damage to another person’s property, such as vehicle repairs, replacements, or damaged structures resulting from said accident.
Insurance companies earn investment profits on "float". Float, or available reserve, is the amount of money on hand at any given moment that an insurer has collected in insurance premiums but has not paid out in claims. Insurers start investing insurance premiums as soon as they are collected and continue to earn interest or other income on them until claims are paid out. The Association of British Insurers (gathering 400 insurance companies and 94% of UK insurance services) has almost 20% of the investments in the London Stock Exchange.[26] In 2007, U.S. industry profits from float totaled $58 billion. In a 2009 letter to investors, Warren Buffett wrote, "we were paid $2.8 billion to hold our float in 2008."[27]
Insuring travel trailers or fifth-wheel trailers (with a special hitch that's installed in the bed of a pickup truck) is generally less expensive than insuring a motorized RV, but premium charges still vary significantly based on state of residence and the size, age and market value of the trailer, plus frequency of use. The owner of a small, older fifth-wheel RV[4] valued at $8,000 reports paying about $170 a year for collision and comprehensive coverage; RV-Dreams.com reports that full-timer coverage[5] on a Keystone Cambridge fifth-wheel cost $896-$924 a year between 2005 and 2009; and RVersOnline.org estimates annual insurance costs of $1,300 a year for a luxury fifth wheel with a medium-duty truck, used 140 days a year.
Insurance company claims departments employ a large number of claims adjusters supported by a staff of records management and data entry clerks. Incoming claims are classified based on severity and are assigned to adjusters whose settlement authority varies with their knowledge and experience. The adjuster undertakes an investigation of each claim, usually in close cooperation with the insured, determines if coverage is available under the terms of the insurance contract, and if so, the reasonable monetary value of the claim, and authorizes payment.
Many baby boomers are doing the same: spending their retirement visiting national parks, historic landmarks, and exploring the country. Empty nesters and the 55+ crowd find that RV living offers both freedom and a strong sense of community. Contrary to the popular belief that RVers are constantly on the move, RV and manufactured home parks also serve as seasonal homes, with plenty of things to do to keep an active lifestyle.

Rental RVs are your responsibility while in your possession, so it's important to make sure you have insurance coverage on the RV. Check with your auto insurance carrier to see if coverage extends to a rental RV. If not, the RV rental dealers usually either automatically include insurance in the price of the rental or have short-term policies available for purchase.
While JD Power-recommended companies above aren’t among the cheapest of the insurance companies we’ve examined, they might suit your needs. It’s important to think beyond price to find a comfortable middle ground between claims satisfaction and affordability. Use The Zebra’s side-by-side insurance comparisons to avoid some of the legwork involved in insurance shopping.

Fifth-wheel trailers offer similar accommodations and amenities to those of Class A or Class C motorhomes, but are towed behind a vehicle, so you don’t have to take them everywhere you go. Toy haulers are basically mobile garages, they can be used to store things like cars, motorcycles, and snowmobiles. Horse trailers, just as the name suggests, are towable trailers used to carry horses or other animals. Cargo or utility trailers are towable metal boxes that are strictly used to store your belongings.


Full-time RVers can enjoy coverage similar to that of homeowners insurance through the Good Sam Insurance Agency’s specialized protection plan for full timers or first-time weekend RVers. Full-Time Insurance goes above and beyond what traditional Auto Insurance policies can protect because it covers a number of other incidents and situations that regular RV insurance does not.
×