^ Berger, Allen N.; Cummins, J. David; Weiss, Mary A. (October 1997). "The Coexistence of Multiple Distribution Systems for Financial Services: The Case of Property-Liability Insurance" (PDF). Journal of Business. 70 (4): 515–46. doi:10.1086/209730. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2000-09-19. (online draft Archived 2010-06-22 at the Wayback Machine)


Whether RV insurance is optional or required, be aware of the pitfalls of going without RV insurance. Lots of RV owners leave their RVs parked out in the open yard, leaving them susceptible to storm damage, vandalism, and possible theft. If your RV holds a great deal of value, make sure to purchase full coverage RV insurance to protect against a potential loss.
Class C motorhomes are the classic mid-sized motorized RV, typically with a sleeping area extending above the cab area. Premiums vary based on state of residence and the size, age and market value of the motorhome, plus frequency of use. An Idaho buyer looking at a supersized Class C motorhome[3] valued at $120,000 was quoted $3,097 a year; some owners report similar rates, but others are paying $800-$1,000 a year.

How much insurance you need, depends on what your priorities are. Obviously, if you took out a loan to purchase your RV, you want to make sure you are covered at full replacement or purchase value so that you can pay off your loan. You’ll also want to get uninsured and underinsured motorists protection in case someone hits you, and they can’t fully pay for your RV’s repair.
The Specialty RV insurance coverage is similar to the Innovative coverage has, but it also includes coverage for emergency expenses like hotels or food if you cannot stay in your RV, personal effects coverage, vacation liability coverage, awning replacement, adjacent structures coverage, purchase price guarantees, and coverage for medical payments. The auto insurance coverage allows you to save up to 20 percent. With a combined policy, if both are damaged in the same accident only one deductible must be paid.

RV Insurance companies take these type of risk factors into account, which makes it more difficult for bus-conversion homeowners to find the best coverage. Also, buses first need to be registered as RVs with the department of motor vehicles beforehand. If not, they’re still considered commercial vehicles instead of personal, and will not qualify for RV insurance. Different states have different requirements as to what qualifies as an RV, many of which include repainting the bus a different color, having a potable water supply, installing a toilet, and having cooking appliances onboard.


While State Farm’s website recommends speaking with an agent to see what discounts are available to you for motorhome insurance, it doesn’t list any universal discounts. It’s still possible to save on your premiums, but there’s less transparency about what you may qualify for. If discounts are important to you, it’s best to get clarity from a State Farm agent on what to expect before signing up.
Many providers offer discounts as rewards for “good” customer behavior. Common ones include discounts for driving safely, paying your entire annual premium upfront, keeping your RV in storage for part of the year, switching from another provider, holding membership in an RV association, or taking an RV safety course. We noted if a provider listed generous discounts available to all customers. However, many discounts vary depending on location. To see if there are any specific to your area and to compare RV insurance prices, ask an agent.
We evaluated each company’s track record with its customers by looking at the available complaint data on online regulatory organizations' pages and by searching for company pages on independent consumer review websites such as the Better Business Bureau. Some companies also provide unfiltered reviews on their own websites, helping to give greater insight into customer satisfaction rates.
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