Although most auto insurance policies offer this one, towing or providing fuel for an RV is much more expensive than towing or filling up a car or an SUV. Having the right roadside assistance coverage is extremely important, especially if you’re far from home. Roadside assistance can help you cover the costs of mechanical or electrical breakdowns, battery failure, flat tires, or lock-outs, among many other things.

The amount of insurance your RV requires will mainly depend on the type of motorhome or towable you own, how often you use it, and whether you plan to reside in it for six or more months out of the year. There are two types of recreational vehicles, the towable trailer and the motorhome, which falls into three categories: Class A, B or C motorhomes. Class A motorhomes are the largest and tend to be the most expensive. They often include luxury features, customized amenities, and permanent attachments that may require additional protection. Class B vehicles are the smallest type of RV, also known as “camper vans,” and are generally much cheaper to insure than larger motorhomes. Class C vehicles are a hybrid of Class A and B.


Loan-Free RV means you own the camper outright without any financing. RV insurance is only optional when your RV has no loan on it and is towable only. Insurance is not optional for motorhomes unless you live in a state that doesn’t require RV insurance. If you're driving your RV on the road, you'll be required to carry the same state-mandated liability insurance you'd need to carry on a regular automobile. These requirements vary by state, but almost every state requires some type of liability coverage for damage you might cause to other vehicles.
With liability coverage, you can ensure that you’re able to cover the medical needs of someone in another vehicle that gets hit. But what if you’re injured during the accident? If you don’t have personal injury coverage, you will have to pay for your medical bills yourself. That’s why personal injury coverage is required in many states. Each state has a different minimum, but you can also get additional coverage above that amount.
While State Farm’s website recommends speaking with an agent to see what discounts are available to you for motorhome insurance, it doesn’t list any universal discounts. It’s still possible to save on your premiums, but there’s less transparency about what you may qualify for. If discounts are important to you, it’s best to get clarity from a State Farm agent on what to expect before signing up.
Enjoying your time camping, exploring, and cruising the open road in your RV is more fun when you have the necessary insurance coverage. Along with essential liability protection, we also offer a full range of additional coverage options to further protect your family, your personal property, and your investment. Our independent agents are here to help you choose just the right policy for your needs whether you use your RV on weekends only or are out and about for months at a time.
On average, an at-fault property damage accident will raise your premium by an average of $612 per year. Because most insurance providers will charge you for three years after an accident, this $612 increase equates to more than $1,800 in total fees. If you’re thinking of filing a claim, consider the overall cost of the claim versus what the claim would cost to pay out of pocket. Compare this $1,837 penalty — plus your deductible (if applicable) — to the out-of-pocket expense. While this is nice information to know before filing a claim, it won’t help if you’ve already filed a claim. If you have an at-fault accident on your insurance history, consider USAA or State Farm.
RV Insurance companies take these type of risk factors into account, which makes it more difficult for bus-conversion homeowners to find the best coverage. Also, buses first need to be registered as RVs with the department of motor vehicles beforehand. If not, they’re still considered commercial vehicles instead of personal, and will not qualify for RV insurance. Different states have different requirements as to what qualifies as an RV, many of which include repainting the bus a different color, having a potable water supply, installing a toilet, and having cooking appliances onboard.

Good Sam Insurance Agency offers RV, auto, home, boat, and motorcycle insurance. It does not provide the insurance directly, but through companies like Progressive, National, and Safeco. Good Sam covers several types of RVs including for Class A RVs, Class B RVs, Class C RVs, conventional trailers, fifth-wheel trailers, pop-up tent trailers, mounted truck campers, horse trailers, and cargo utility vehicles.
If you live in your RV full-time for more than six months of the year, Allstate will not be able to insure your RV. Because of that, Allstate is a more suitable provider for people who only use their RVs occasionally: Its policies include basic coverage, sound system coverage, personal belongings coverage, medical payment, roadside assistance, and rental reimbursement.
If you purchase a new travel trailer for $10,000 cash, insurance is optional because there's no finance company involved; however, you would probably still want to carry full coverage on it. A total loss, such as fire or theft, would be devastating to most people without insurance to cover the investment-loss costs of your RV. Determine the value of your RV versus the likelihood of a loss to before you decide to self-insure your travel trailer’s physical damage risk and see if it’s really worth it.
^ Anzovin, Steven, Famous First Facts 2000, item # 2422, H. W. Wilson Company, ISBN 0-8242-0958-3 p. 121 The first life insurance company known of record was founded in 1706 by the Bishop of Oxford and the financier Thomas Allen in London, England. The company, called the Amicable Society for a Perpetual Assurance Office, collected annual premiums from policyholders and paid the nominees of deceased members from a common fund.
We are a busy family, but like to take occasional trips with our motor home. We didn't think we needed a specialized policy because our motor home is parked in our driveway most of the time. Unfortunately, our motor home was vandalized and some theft occurred. Our auto policy did not cover the losses and we ended up paying for the damage ourselves. We learned our lesson and now have a motorhome insurance policy that includes comprehensive coverage that our auto policy didn't include.
Definite loss: The loss takes place at a known time, in a known place, and from a known cause. The classic example is death of an insured person on a life insurance policy. Fire, automobile accidents, and worker injuries may all easily meet this criterion. Other types of losses may only be definite in theory. Occupational disease, for instance, may involve prolonged exposure to injurious conditions where no specific time, place, or cause is identifiable. Ideally, the time, place, and cause of a loss should be clear enough that a reasonable person, with sufficient information, could objectively verify all three elements.
As far as I know, National General has only been selling RV insurance under the name of National General since 2012/2013 as it was formerly the old GMAC insurance. We had GMAC when it changed its name to National General. I was not happy with their customer service nor their premium structure and they also sharply raised their rates for us shortly after the name change.
In the European Union, the Third Non-Life Directive and the Third Life Directive, both passed in 1992 and effective 1994, created a single insurance market in Europe and allowed insurance companies to offer insurance anywhere in the EU (subject to permission from authority in the head office) and allowed insurance consumers to purchase insurance from any insurer in the EU.[48] As far as insurance in the United Kingdom, the Financial Services Authority took over insurance regulation from the General Insurance Standards Council in 2005;[49] laws passed include the Insurance Companies Act 1973 and another in 1982,[50] and reforms to warranty and other aspects under discussion as of 2012.[51]
Earthquake insurance is a form of property insurance that pays the policyholder in the event of an earthquake that causes damage to the property. Most ordinary home insurance policies do not cover earthquake damage. Earthquake insurance policies generally feature a high deductible. Rates depend on location and hence the likelihood of an earthquake, as well as the construction of the home.
The state of North Carolina has the lowest overall motor home and RV insurance rates with a median premium of $870 per year and $72.50 per month. Oregon is the second lowest RV Insurance coverage and Massachusetts ranks 3rd with an RV insurance cost of $1,098 per year ($91.50 per month). Insurance rates in Massachusetts’s rates are so low because there is so much competition among agencies, and just to compete, agencies reduce rates to attract new clients.  When there is a surplus of anything in the world, competition goes up and prices go down.
By the late 19th century governments began to initiate national insurance programs against sickness and old age. Germany built on a tradition of welfare programs in Prussia and Saxony that began as early as in the 1840s. In the 1880s Chancellor Otto von Bismarck introduced old age pensions, accident insurance and medical care that formed the basis for Germany's welfare state.[11][12] In Britain more extensive legislation was introduced by the Liberal government in the 1911 National Insurance Act. This gave the British working classes the first contributory system of insurance against illness and unemployment.[13] This system was greatly expanded after the Second World War under the influence of the Beveridge Report, to form the first modern welfare state.[11][14]

Pollution insurance usually takes the form of first-party coverage for contamination of insured property either by external or on-site sources. Coverage is also afforded for liability to third parties arising from contamination of air, water, or land due to the sudden and accidental release of hazardous materials from the insured site. The policy usually covers the costs of cleanup and may include coverage for releases from underground storage tanks. Intentional acts are specifically excluded.
For this review, we focused on national providers and left out any companies that only insure RVs locally. Odds are, national insurers are able to provide coverage no matter where you are in the U.S., and they are more likely to have the financial strength to support you. If you’re trusting a provider to come through when you’re most in need, it’s reassuring to have a company with years of experience and a history of financial success at your back.
National Interstate Insurance’s policy combines the features of an auto policy with those of a homeowners policy, as an RV is often considered a home on wheels. Coverage can include motorhomes, fifth wheel vehicles, bus conversions, stationary trailers, or travel trailers. Insurance for bus conversions can run up to $2 million in many states with liability limits of up to $1 million. National Interstate also insure your tow vehicle.
Lastly, National General has discounts that are aimed at attracting supporters and members of certain organizations. For example, active and retired General Motors employees, current employees of General Motors suppliers, such as Chevrolet, Hummer, and Pontiac, OnStar subscribers, and GM/GMAC customers are all eligible for discounts on their premiums.
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